Aeneas' encounter with Deiphobus forms a critical juncture in Vergil's "Aeneid". In the underworld Aeneas retraces his past to its beginning; so too Vergil's audience returns to its starting point: the fall of Troy. Deiphobus himself is a metonym of Troy, embodying her guilt and punishment. But Aeneas is frustrated in his attempt to reconcile himself to this past. Aeneas attempts the Homeric rites of remembrance-heroic tumulus and epic fama-but these prove to be empty gestures. The aition of Deiphobus' tomb is revealed to have miscarried. Rhoeteum was known as the tomb and shrine of Telamonian Ajax, not Deiphobus, and Octavian's recent restoration of the Rhoetean memorial would have strengthened the already close association between Rhoeteum and Ajax in the mind of Vergil's audience. Vergil exploits Rhoeteum's resonance with Telamonian Ajax and Odysseus, Antony and Octavian, to reflect on the process of constructing national memory, a process of which epic is an integral part. Vergil suggests that one hero's memorial frequently involves the appropriation and effacement of another. In a similar vein, the heroic fama of Deiphobus which Aeneas had heard in Troy is proven false. Deiphobus' narrative of his death is replete with Odyssean allusions which critique both Homeric heroism and Homeric kleos. Evocative allusions to Catullus' laments for his brother suggest eternal elegiac mourning as an alternate generic model for memorial and reconciliation with the past. But Aeneas is denied this option. At the center of the epic, at high noon, on a cosmic crossroads, Aeneas is poised between past and future, between mourning and hope, between Deiphobus and Deiphobe, between epic and elegiac. The Sibyl interrupts and moves Aeneas forward. Aeneas is not purged of his past, but rather denied the opportunity for true reconciliation, which is bestowed not by forgetting but by remembrance.

[Footnotes]

[Footnotes]
1
Kenneth Reckford 1981: 93.
Brooks Otis 1959: 165-79
1963: 290.
2
Otis 1963: 297.
3
David Quint 1993: 63.
4
Quint 1993: 64-65.
5
R. A. B. Mynors 1969.
6
Robert Fitzgerald 1983
7
Michael Paschalis (1997: 232)
8
Jeffrey Wills (1996: 155, 171)
9
Paschalis 1997: 24-26.
12
Aeneid 3.108-10
Iliad 20.216-18
Aen, 3.147-71
Iliad 20.216-18
Hellanicus fr. 24 Jacoby
Diod. Sic. 4.75.1
Dion. Hal. 1.50.3, 1.61.4, 1.62.1-2
13
R. G. Austin 1977: 173.
14
H. Rackham 1969.
Lucan 9.961-65
Lucian's Charon 23
Little Iliad (Proclus) fr. 3 (Davies)
Apollodorus Epitome 5.7.
Herod. 7.43
Scylax. p. 35
Pomp. Mela 1.18
Thuc. 4.52, 8.101
Apollon. Rhod. 1.929
Tryphiod. 216
Livy 37.37.
15
H. L. Jones 1969.
16
Aeneas' epithet ductor Rhoeteius atAeneid 12.456
R. 0. A. M. Lyne (1987: 11-12)
R. J. Rowland (1992: 237-43)
Telamonian Ajax in Aeneid 12
Rhoeteum in Aeneid 6.
17
W. H. S. Jones and H. A. Ormerod, 1977.
18
W. R. Paton 1970.
22
Nicholas Horsfall 1979: 39-40.
Eduard Norden (on Aen. 6.507)
23
Clifford Weber (1995: 30)
Aeneid 6.232-33
Aeneas' own: "Aeneid 6.232-33
24
Charles Segal 1966: 38.
25
P. A. Brunt and J. M. Moore 1967.
26
Simon Goldhill (1991: 323-24)
Idmon, Argonautica 2.481ff.
27
Segal 1966: 638 and 641.
28
Otis 1963: 292-94
G. N. Knauer 1964: 108-112
Eckard Lefevre 1978 passim
R. Lamacchia 1979: 431-62
James Tatum 1984: 44-51
Antonio Martina 1984: 920-22.
30
Oxford Latin Dictionary 1986: 1606-1608, and also "linquo," 1033.
33
Troy (Aen. 6.507-508).
T. E. V. Pearce (1983: 112-15)
34
James J. O'Hara 1997: 174
G. J. M. Bartelink 1965: 30.
35
Alessandro Barchiesi 1995: 54.
Horsfall (1990)
1990: 53
Barchiesi (1994: 117-18
1995: 51-54)
36
Thomas W. Allen 1908.
37
Richmond Lattimore 1965.
38
Demodocus' song in Odyssey 8
39
Aen. 6.527
40
Mihoko Suzuki 1989: 100.
41
Austin 1961
W. S. Camps 1969: 123-26
G. B. Conte 1986: 196-207.
G. P. Goold 1970
Charles Murgia 1971
D. Gall, 1995.
Austin 1964: 219
Conte 1985: 197 n. 2
R. Drew Griffith 1995
Rory B. Egan 1996.
42
Suzuki 1989: 103.
43
Conte 1986: 152-54.
44
Reckford 1981: 93-95
Otis 1963: 292 and 296
Knauer 1964: 114-117.
45
Suzuki 1989: 101.
46
Sophocles Electra 445
Richard Jebb's commentary ad loc.
47
Reckford 1981: 94.
48
J. N. Adams (1980: 51-53)
49
Reckford 1981: 95.
50
Reckford 1981: 93-95
Yardley 1981: 65-66.
51
Callimachus' hymns (1993: 59)
52
R. A. B. Mynors 1958.
53
Charles Martin 1990
54
ad loc. Austin 1977
C. J. Fordyce 1961
Kenneth Quinn 1973
Ettore Paratore 1979.
55
Catullus 65.1 in Aeneid 6.520
56
Conte 1986: 35.
Stephen Hinds (1998: 21-25)
57
T. P. Wiseman 1985: 159.
Paul Allen Miller 1994: 391-92.
60
Most 1992: 1026
62
D. F. S. Thomson 1997: 445
Catullus 68.19-21 (fraterna ... frater ... frater) and 68.91-93 (fratri ... frater ... fratri)
63
Conte 1986: 32-39
Odyssey 1.1-4
William Fitzgerald (1995: 187-89)
64
M. C. J. Putnam 1995-1996: 94.
65
Putnam 1995-96: 81-101
n. 3.
Catullus 66 at Aeneid 6.460
Egil Kraggerud 1997: 105-17
R. Drew Griffith 1995: 58-59.
66
Segal's introduction, Conte 1986: 13-14.
68
Tibullus 2.5.67- 68
Varro RD 4 fr. 56a (Cardauns)
Susan Skulsky (1987)
Jean Hubaux (1939)
69
A. J. Boyle 1986: 148.
70
A. La Penna 1978: 1004.
71
Aen. 4.323-24
Aen. 4.381
72
Jasper Griffin 1979: 59-80.
73
ductor Rhoeteius in Aeneid 12
note 16 above.
74
Segal 1965: 619.

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