[Footnotes]

[Footnotes]
1
René Girard, "Hamlet's Dull Revenge," Stanford Literature Review 1 (1984) 159-200.
2
René Girard, La violence et le sacré, (Paris, 1972)
Patrick Gregory as Violence and the Sacred (Baltimore, 1977).
Girard's To Double Business Bound: Essays on Literature, Mimesis and Anthropology (Balti- more, 1978)
"Generative Scapegoating," in Violent Origins: Ritual Killing and Cultural Formation, ed. Robert G. Hamerton-Kelly, (Stanford, 1987).
Girard's Things Hidden since the Foundation of the World (Stanford, 1987).
Hayden White, "Ethnological 'Lie' and Mythical 'Truth,'" Diacritics 8 (1978) 2-9
Philippe Lacoue-Labarthe, "Mimesis and Truth," ibid. 10-23.
Josue Harari's "Critical Factions/Critical Fictions," in Textual Strategies: Perspectives in Post-Structuralist Criticism, ed. J. Harari, (Ithaca, N.Y., 1979), 53-60.
F. T. Griffiths, "Girard on the Greeks/The Greeks on Girard," Berkshire Review 14 (1979) 20-36
Carl Rubino's review article in MLN 87 (1973) 986-98
Helene Foley, Ritual Irony: Poetry and Sacrifice in Euripides (Ithaca, N.Y., 1985), esp. 46-64.
Girard in "Loss of Self, Suffering, Violence: The Modern View of Dionysus from Nietzsche to Girard," HSCP 88 (1984) 205-40.
3
Pietro Pucci gives the most recent criticism of Girard's theory of the arbitrariness of the scapegoat: "The Tragic Pharmakos of the Oedipus Rex," Helios 17 (1990) 41-50.
4
Kenneth Reckford, "Phaedra and Pasiphae: The Pull Backward," TAPA 104 (1974) 307-28.
5
Ulrich von Wilamowitz-Moellendorff stresses the connections between the stories of Aegeus, Theseus, and Hippolytus to the point of suggesting a possible trilogy: "Excurse zu Euripi- des' Medea," Hermes 15 (1880) 482ff.
Albin Lesky finds Wilamowitz's speculation "unsicher": Die tragische Dichtung der Hellenen, 3d ed. (Göttingen, 1972), 381.
Bernard Knox, "The Medea of Euripides," YClS 25 (1977), esp. 193-95.
G. Devereux, for one, points out these passages, but offers no solutions or suggestions: The Character of the Euripidean Hippolytos: An Ethno- Psychoanalytical Study (Chico, Calif., 1985) 95-96.
W. S. Barrett in his commentary (Euripides: Hippolytus [Oxford, 1964])
C. P. Segal ("Shame and Purity in Euripides' Hippolytus," Hermes 98 [1970] 296)
Wilamowitz (483)
Wilamowitz and Hans Herter ("Theseus und Hippolytus," RhM 89 [1940] 273-92)
6
Barrett (supra, n. 5) on 34-37
Segal (supra, n. 5) 296.
Pausanias (1.29.10)
7
Barrett (supra, n. 5)
8
Herter (supra, n. 5: 285)
9
Girard (supra, n. 2 [1977]) 39-41
Foley (supra, n. 2) 147-204.
10
"King Lear: The Family Romance," The Centennial Review 23 (1979) 348-76
"Text against Performance: The Gloucester Family Romance," in Shakespeare's Rough Magic: Renais- sance Essays in Honor of C. L. Barber, ed. P. Erickson and C. Kahn (Newark, N.J., 1985), 210-29
"Text against Performance: The Example of Macbeth," Genre 15 (1982) 49-70.
Richard Levin, who views Berger as part of the "character assassination school" of criticism, criticizes this last article in "The New Refutation of Shakespeare," Modern Philology 83 (1985) 123-41.
11
Berger (supra, n. 10 [1985]) 213.
On Aristotle and Greek Tragedy (London, 1962).
12
Berger (supra, n. 10 [1979]) 349.
13
Bernard Knox, "The Hippolytus of Euripides," YClS 13 (1952) 3-31.
14
Knox (ibid.) 29-31.
15
Knox (ibid.) 3.
Devereux (supra, n. 5: 135)
16
The Dramatic Festivals of Athens, 2d ed. [Oxford, 1968], 145
17
Charles Segal, "Pentheus and Hippolytus on the Couch and on the Grid: Psychoanalytic and Structural Readings of Greek Tragedy," CW 72 (1978) 129-48
Froma Zeitlin, "The Power of Aphrodite: Eros and the Boundaries of the Self in the Hippolytus," in Directions in Euripidean Criticism: A Collection of Essays (Durham, N.C., 1985) 52- 111
Devereux (supra, n. 5).
18
Zeitlin (supra, n. 17) 66.
19
Barrett (supra, n. 5: ad loc.)
20
Euripides' Andromache (173-76)
21
Devereux (supra, n. 5) 59-64.
22
Cedric H. Whitman, Sophocles: A Study in Heroic Humanism (Cam- bridge, 1951).
23
Robert Parker observes, "Religious danger is almost always potentially communal in Greece": Miasma: Pollution and Purification in Early Greek Religion (Oxford, 1983) 10.
Girard (supra, n. 2 [1977: 114])
24
Segal (supra, n. 17) esp. 134-35.
25
Girard (supra, n. 2 [1977]) 169-92.
26
Ibid. 174-75.
27
Zeitlin (supra, n. 17) 56.
28
Herter's attitude is representative (supra, n. 5: 290)
29
Devereux (supra, n. 5)
A. V. Rankin, "Euripides' Hippolytus: A Psychopathological Hero," Arethusa 15 (1982) 181-201.
30
Berger (supra, n. 10 [1985]) 213.
31
Devereux (supra, n. 5) 64.
33
Berger (supra, n. 10 [1985]) 212.
35
Barrett (supra, n. 5: ad loc.)
36
Devereux (supra, n. 5) 115-19.
Barrett (supra, n. 5)
38
Devereux (supra, n. 5) 72-75.
Jan Bremer observes that accusations of parricide often accompanied accusations of incest, a pattern that the events of this play could reflect: "Oedipus and the Greek Oedipus Complex," in Interpretations of Greek Mythology, ed. J. Bremer (Totowa, N.J., 1986), 41-59.
40
Richard Garner, Law and Society in Classical Athens (New York, 1987).
41
E. R. Dodds, "The Al6Sg of Phaedra and the meaning of the Hippolytus," CR 39 (1925) 102-10.
42
Zeitlin's recent study (supra, n. 17)
David Konstan's review in Comparative Drama 20 (1986) 82-85.
43
Jacques Lacan, Ecrits: A Selection (New York, 1977) 65.
44
[Unrepresented Characters], 78, 998
[Unrepresented Characters], 83, 656, 996, 1368
[Unrepresented Characters], 80, 667, 995, 1007, 1013, 1034, 1100, 1365
[Unrepresented Characters], 1028.
45
[Unrepresented Characters], 244, 335, 385
[Unrepresented Characters], 413, 731
[Unrepresented Characters], 335
[Unrepresented Characters], 405, 423, 489, 687, 717.
46
[Unrepresented Characters], 1258
[Unrepresented Characters], 896, 1080, 1454
[Unrepresented Characters] , 949.
48
Charles Segal, "The Tragedy of Hippolytus: The Waters of the Ocean and the Untouched Meadow," HSCP 70 (1965) 120-21.
50
Segal (supra, n. 5) 291.
51
Gregory Nagy, The Best of the Achaeans: Concepts of the Hero in Archaic Greek Poetry (Baltimore, 1979), esp. 28-29, 35-41.
52
Girard's discussion (supra, n. 2 [1977: 151-53])
53
Segal (supra, n. 5) 284, 291
David Claus, "Phaedra and the Socratic Paradox," YClS 22 (1972) 230-35.
E. R. Dodds, The Greeks and the Irrational (Berkeley and Los Angeles, 1951), esp. p. 18
54
Segal (supra, n. 5) 283-84.
55
Helen North, Sophrosyne: Self-Knowledge and Restraint in Greek Literature (Ithaca, N.Y., 1966) 80.
56
Segal (supra, n. 5: 284ff.)
58
North (supra, n. 55) 68-84.
59
Zeitlin (supra, n. 17: 64)
60
Dodds (supra, n. 41) 103.
61
Barrett (supra, n. 5: ad loc.)
62
North (supra, n. 55) 81.
63
Dodds (supra, n. 41) 104.
64
Girard (supra, n. 2 [1977]) 79.
65
Jan Bremmer, "Scapegoat Rituals in Ancient Greece," HSCP 87 (1983) 301-20
Walter Burkert, Structure and History in Greek Mythology and Ritual (Berkeley and Los Angeles, 1979) ch. 3
Parker (supra, n. 23) ch. 9
J.-P. Vernant, in J.-P. Vernant and P. Vidal-Naquet, Myth and Tragedy in Ancient Greece (Brighton, Mass., 1981) 87-119.
66
"Coriolanus and the Delights of Faction," in Language as Symbolic Action (Berkeley and Los Angeles, 1966) 81.
Adrian Poole observes another similarity: "Like Coriolanus, he [Hippolytus] insists on saying things in public that are better kept under cover" (Tragedy: Shake- speare and the Greek Example [Oxford, 1987] 155).
67
Parker (supra, n. 23) 272-73.
68
Segal (supra, n. 48) 143ff.
69
Girard (supra, n. 2 [1987]) 186.
70
Segal (supra, n. 48) 146.
71
Devereux (supra, n. 5: 12-13, 141-150)
72
Girard (supra, n. 2 [1977]) 161.
Hipp. (165)
74
Pietro Pucci, "Euripides: The Monument and the Sacrifice," Arethusa 10 (1977) 185-86.
75
Barrett (supra, n. 5: ad loc.)
76
Kenneth Reckford, "Phaethon, Hippolytus and Aphrodite," TAPA 103 (1972) 414-16
George E. Dimock, Jr., "Euripides' Hippolytus; or, Virtue Rewarded," YClS 25 (1977) 241-42.
77
Walter Burkert, Homo Necans: The Anthropology of Ancient Greek Sacrificial Ritual and Myth (Berkeley and Los Angeles, 1983) 62.
78
Zeitlin (supra, n. 17: 78)
79
Girard (supra, n. 2 [1987]) 90.
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