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japanese-internment

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Journal Articles
Boom. 2013; 3292–110 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/boom.2013.3.2.92
Published: 01 July 2013
... Cesar Chavez, the bleak warm tales of William Saroyan to the harsh reality of Japanese internment, the Central Valley grows stories so tragic, deep, and humanly rich that in just 100 years or so it's claimed far more than seems its fair share in the broader American tale. Every year brings another crop...
Journal Articles
Boom. 2011; 1410–15 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/boom.2011.1.4.10
Published: 01 November 2011
... hard-nosed Republican. He was not an effective senator and served only one term, becoming infamous for sleeping during meetings. He also justified the World War II internment of Japanese Americans and Canadians and favored declaring English America's national language. His later image as an anti...
Journal Articles
Boom. 2016; 6318–24 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/boom.2016.6.3.18
Published: 01 September 2016
... urban humanists based in Los Angeles. © 2016 by The Regents of the University of California 2016 Oakland Los Angeles the North creative writing LA literature Japanese Americans Japanese churches spatiality time Urban Humanities Anime Wong Tropic of Orange karen tei yamashita A...
Journal Articles
Boom. 2016; 6176–87 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/boom.2016.6.1.76
Published: 01 March 2016
...; but when a hundred or so Japanese Angelenos moved there, wealthy whites fled, and their void was largely filled by Mexicans and Eastern Europeans, including Greeks especially after the California Alien Land Law in 1920 all but halted Japanese immigration. Greek immigrant Sam Chrys opened C & K...
Journal Articles
Boom. 2015; 5454–63 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/boom.2015.5.4.54
Published: 01 December 2015
... their penitential andas. We have wept at altars for the dead on D ´a de los Muertos. We have joined aging internees on their annual pilgrimage to Manzanar, the Japanese internment camp, where we braced against the harsh winds and dust to chant, dance, and pray for forgiveness for us all. BOOM | W I N T...
Journal Articles
Boom. 2015; 541–2 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/boom.2015.5.4.1
Published: 01 December 2015
... photographs protesting Japanese Amer- ican internment during World War II. When we think of Ansel Adams s photographs of the Sierra Nevada, we usu- ally thinking of the austere beauty of photographs such as Winter Sunrise, the Sierra Nevada, from Lone Pine, California taken in Owens Valley in 1944. There...
Journal Articles
Boom. 2015; 5420–33 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/boom.2015.5.4.20
Published: 01 December 2015
...- cisco s Chinatown dates to the Gold Rush. Cameron House, a vibrant social service agency, started as a Presbyterian women s mission to combat the indentured servitude and coerced prostitution of Chinese women. The San Francisco Buddhist Center is a Japanese Pure Land Buddhist temple founded in 1898...
Journal Articles
Boom. 2015; 5398–108 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/boom.2015.5.3.98
Published: 01 September 2015
... concerned whether dropping the bombs on the unsuspecting Japanese was truly necessary or whether doing so over an unpopulated atoll would deliver a suffi- ciently grim and compelling message to the Japanese regime. The record tells us that the last holdout against dropping the bombs on populated areas was...
Journal Articles
Boom. 2015; 5188–91 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/boom.2015.5.1.88
Published: 01 March 2015
..., from lynchings to internment, exclusion acts to good ol fear-mongering, with nearly every other group getting in on the act. But one group has always embraced Asians more than others in California: Mexicans, and in this unlikely-but- growing relationship lies California s future, a future already...
Journal Articles
Boom. 2015; 5150–61 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/boom.2015.5.1.50
Published: 01 March 2015
...Elizabeth Logan Planners of San Francisco’s 1915 Panama-Pacific International Exposition wanted to present their city as the center of an American empire that stretched from Maine to the Philippines. The fair’s head landscape engineer John McLaren and his team spent three years planning and...
Journal Articles
Boom. 2015; 5179–85 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/boom.2015.5.1.79
Published: 01 March 2015
...Suzanne Fischer “Pacific” was the key term in the name of San Francisco's Panama Pacific International Exposition. The fair presented a vision of an increasingly unified Pacific region under the control of American economic and political power. Of course, California had been part of a coherent...
Journal Articles
Boom. 2015; 5162–70 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/boom.2015.5.1.62
Published: 01 March 2015
...Abigail Markwyn Labor relations during the run up to and duration of the Panama-Pacific International Exposition in 1915 have been called the “Pax Panama Pacifica” thanks to unwritten agreements between fair planners and key labor unions in San Francisco. Fair planners intended to use the...
Journal Articles
Boom. 2015; 514–11 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/boom.2015.5.1.4
Published: 01 March 2015
...Thomas J. Osborne San Francisco’s 1915 Panama-Pacific International Exposition, celebrating the opening of the Panama Canal, symbolized California’s desire for preeminence in Pacific trade and naval power. The expected reopening of an enlarged Panama Canal in 2015 is causing shippers, ports, and...
Journal Articles
Boom. 2014; 4497–101 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/boom.2014.4.4.97
Published: 01 December 2014
... Beat Museum Russian and Japanese tourists in California Los Angeles noir Charles Bukowski jonah raskin Genius Loci The strange alchemy of California s literary shrines A s the chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts, California poet andessayist Dana Gioia was an evangelist for California...
Journal Articles
Boom. 2014; 43113–121 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/boom.2014.4.3.113
Published: 01 September 2014
.... DOI: 10.1525/boom.2014.4.3.113. BOOM | F A L L 20 14 113 science. I wanted my students to see California with rever- ence and awe, while not ignoring its flaws and internal contradictions. I wanted us to get immersed in its cold Pacific waters, to cover our hands in octopus ink and the slime of...
Journal Articles
Boom. 2014; 4220–23 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/boom.2014.4.2.20
Published: 01 June 2014
... of Mexi- cans, Filipinos, Japanese (during WWII), and Russians. But what about the Chinese example? Were they the model minority (for working so hard) or were they unfair to native-born Americans (by working so hard) familial and entrepreneurial at the same time? Photograph of Clement Street by Tito...
Journal Articles
Boom. 2014; 4111–17 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/boom.2014.4.1.11
Published: 01 March 2014
... young freelance journalists and Chinese information ministry employees operated a shortwave station known as XGOY to broadcast free China’s news and information. Despite the fact that the station was constantly bombarded and Japanese forces jammed its signal, Doc Stuart’s mastery of shortwave radio was...
Journal Articles
Boom. 2013; 3454–66 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/boom.2013.3.4.54
Published: 01 December 2013
... successive waves of immigrants, refugees, and internal migrants have found California s soil and climate well suited to sustaining traditional farming practices, and with them, lifeways. This has included Portuguese and Ital- ian grape growers in Napa; Japanese flower cultivators in the East Bay; socialist...
Journal Articles
Boom. 2013; 3117–33 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/boom.2013.3.1.17
Published: 01 May 2013
... site and its community. © 2013 by the Regents of the University of California 2013 Japanese confinement concentration camps pilgrimage site historic sites shelley cannady Tule Lake Today Internment and its legacies O n the surface, Tule Lake is not much to look at. Its natural scenery is...
Journal Articles
Boom. 2012; 2345–61 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/boom.2012.2.3.45
Published: 01 October 2012
..., during World War II, Japanese immigrants and Japanese American citizens, who had settled in the county as farmers and merchants from the turn of the century, were forced into concentration camps. This dark underside of Colfax history seems strangely at odds with its susceptibility to legend and miracle...