In an intimate alcove within the Los Angeles Art Association’s Gallery 825, the three walls were papered, nearly floor to ceiling, with mostly black-and-white framed photographs of mostly Black people and a few white people, captured at work or play, as if by some family shutterbug intent on memorializing each moment, no matter how mundane. In pictures spanning more than forty years, photographer Lisa McCord documented people of the small farming community of Rotan, in the Mississippi Delta of northeastern Arkansas, focusing on her grandparents, who owned a cotton farm, and the workers they employed. The sixty-two photographs that were in the exhibition are mostly McCord’s work, taken primarily in the early 1980s. For historical context, the artist also included several pictures of her family by an unknown photographer. The exhibition was titled Rotan Switch after a local landmark,...

You do not currently have access to this content.