In 1979, philosopher and sociologist Jean-François Lyotard argued the concept of “grand narratives” and the way they defined storytelling in modern times.1 For the most part, grand narratives are used to effectively promote dominant ideologies and largely shape what is later documented as “official history.” However, every narrative we encounter, whether visual or textual, or of any other medium, is the result of someone’s choices and has been adjusted and/or edited several times before being presented as an integral structure. This is especially the case for artistic representations, where public engagement relies on what is presented as a valid and cohesive body of information. For example, when a film reaches an audience, it is not the full version that was originally compiled, but a shorter, more coherent production. Such practices are expected and considered acceptable in the film...

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