In most surveys of transnational digital media cultures, there is a tendency to treat the diffusion of technology and capital as a flattening, where the Anglophone West as the epicenter relays technological novelties and a premade trajectory of progress to the periphery, or conceives of the Global South as pure contrast, whose histories are impossibly different, alien, or distant. Neither problem can be resolved by exclusively foregrounding the national as the dominant paradigm for understanding the flows of digitization. The editors of Global Digital Cultures: Perspectives from South Asia, Aswin Punathambekar and Sriram Mohan, present thirteen essays from media scholars in Bangladesh, India, Myanmar, and Pakistan to make a necessary intervention in media studies through “granular, experiential engagement” (15) with South Asian contexts. If the digital “is now everywhere … it is also in a series of somewheres, and it is through one such somewhere, South Asia, that...

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