Southern California artist Sandra de la Loza describes herself as a performative archivist. Her ongoing collaborative project, the Pocho Research Society of Erased and Invisible History, is perhaps the most direct reflection of how her work melds the functions of historian, curator, and scholar. Her practice extends to a long-time involvement as an activist and supporter of spaces that are platforms for artistic production, community action, and critical dialogue concerned with the histories of people of color.

Recently on view at the Armory Center for the Arts in Pasadena was a one-person exhibition of de la Loza’s immersive installation Mi Casa Es Su Casa. It was first exhibited in 2002...

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