1-20 of 58 Search Results for

telophase

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2014; 767478–479 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2014.76.7.11
Published: 01 September 2014
... Press’s Rights and Permissions Web site at http://www.ucpressjournals.com/reprintinfo.asp . 2014 Cell cycle mitosis onion root tip interphase prophase metaphase anaphase telophase Dinner-size paper plate Protractor Ruler Colored pencils References Biology Project...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2017; 796482–491 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2017.79.6.482
Published: 01 August 2017
... the teaching team walked around answering questions and facilitating discussions in groups. For boxes 4 and 5, students used evidence from their model to explain how and why chromosomes sort as Sparticus biologicus progresses from prophase I to telophase I, and continued following the genetic...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2016; 787613–614 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2016.78.7.613
Published: 01 September 2016
... mitosis.” Does that bring prophase, metaphase, anaphase, and telophase to mind (that makes four phases)? The author means “three rounds of mitosis,” which has a different meaning. There is more to discuss. On page 87, the author writes of “Darwin's theory” about the existence of a pollinator. But as a...
Images
Double-Spring Model for demonstrating mitosis in the classroom. (A) Prophas...
Published: 01 April 2012
replicated chromosomes are at the equator of the cell with the springs at equal lengths. (C) Anaphase: the sister chromatids physically separate and move toward opposite poles, which is caused by the shrinkage of the springs. (D) Telophase: the chromosomes move to the poles when the springs shrink to their replicated chromosomes are at the equator of the cell with the springs at equal lengths. (C) Anaphase: the sister chromatids physically separate and move toward opposite poles, which is caused by the shrinkage of the springs. (D) Telophase: the chromosomes move to the poles when the springs shrink to their More
Images
Double-Spring Model for demonstrating meiosis in the classroom. (A) Prophas...
Published: 01 April 2012
homologous chromosomes are at the equator of the cell with equal lengths of the springs. (C) Anaphase: the homologous chromosome pairs physically separate and move toward opposite poles, which is caused by shrinkage of the springs. (D) Telophase: the chromosomes move to the poles when the springs shrink to homologous chromosomes are at the equator of the cell with equal lengths of the springs. (C) Anaphase: the homologous chromosome pairs physically separate and move toward opposite poles, which is caused by shrinkage of the springs. (D) Telophase: the chromosomes move to the poles when the springs shrink to More
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2012; 744266–269 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2012.74.4.11
Published: 01 April 2012
... replicated chromosomes are at the equator of the cell with the springs at equal lengths. (C) Anaphase: the sister chromatids physically separate and move toward opposite poles, which is caused by the shrinkage of the springs. (D) Telophase: the chromosomes move to the poles when the springs shrink to their...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2011; 735299 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2011.73.5.13
Published: 01 May 2011
.... Unfortunately, that is not the case. When I asked my AP Biology students what mitosis was, they immediately shouted "PMAT." When I asked for some clarification, they were able to recite prophase, metaphase, anaphase, and telophase. When I further asked about the process, I got a lot of blank stares. I had hoped...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2009; 715308–309 doi: https://doi.org/10.2307/27669437
Published: 01 May 2009
... phase of the learning cycle, Explain, the instructor distributes a handout that describes the cell cycle and contains a drawing and microscopic view of intcrphase, prophase, mctaphase, anaphasc, and telophase. The instructor may or may not choose to give a lecture at this point; my students required...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2008; 70117–22 doi: https://doi.org/10.2307/30163188
Published: 01 January 2008
... normal cell growth. Cell division is a topic presented in general biology courses. Students LANCE ARMSTRONG CANCER STORY 17 learn to recognize the different arrangements of the chro- mosomes during the M phase of the cell cycle: prophase, metaphase, anaphase, telophase, and interphase, often using the...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2006; 686357–361 doi: https://doi.org/10.2307/4452012
Published: 01 August 2006
... topic of mitosis or meiosis for the first time, I tend to use these models to provide an over- view of what happens to the chromosomes before actually describing the phases (i.e., interphase, prophase, meta- phase, anaphase, and telophase). This way the students get to see how chromosomes must align so...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2004; 66135–39 doi: https://doi.org/10.2307/4451614
Published: 01 January 2004
... unreplicated chromosomes and move to opposite poles of the spindle Telophase? (Spindle dissolves, chromosomes unwind and cytokinesis occurs.) 3. Is the number of chromosomes reduced or pre- served in mitosis? 4. Does crossing over occur? Independent assort- ment? Segregation? If so, where? HUMAN CHROMOSONES 37...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 1999; 614284–286 doi: https://doi.org/10.2307/4450672
Published: 01 April 1999
.... ANAPHASE I-What occurs here? In each group of four sticks, two chromosomes are pulled to one pole and two chromosomes are pulled to the other pole. (Homologs are now separate.) 10. TELOPHASE I-What happens here? Chromosomes are pulled all the way and cytokinesis produces two cells. You should observe that...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2000; 623204–206 doi: https://doi.org/10.2307/4450874
Published: 01 March 2000
... For a cell with 2N = 4 chromo- somes, construct a succession of model cells showing interphase (G1) prior to meiosis; G2 prior to meiosis; prophase I (zygotene); prophase I (pachytene); metaphase I; anaphase I; telophase I; prophase II; metaphase II; anaphase II, and telophase II. As you construct...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 1999; 61160–61 doi: https://doi.org/10.2307/4450612
Published: 01 January 1999
...-discuss independent assortment, diversity among siblings). Anaphase I * Homologs are pulled apart. * Student homologs back away from one another. (Say goodbye to your homolog!) Telophase I * Divide into two cells. * Form two groups of students. Interphase II * Chromosomes become invisible. * Put the cards...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 1998; 606471 doi: https://doi.org/10.2307/4450527
Published: 01 June 1998
... in cartoon form as a cell with a head and face. The sole description of the molecular events of telophase are described by a balloon above the cell's 'head' which states, 'my nuclear membrane heals but for a brief time, I am a schizo- phrenic.' I envision such tongue-in- cheek references causing some...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 1998; 606470–471 doi: https://doi.org/10.2307/4450526
Published: 01 June 1998
.... Although the at- tempt at humor can be appreciated for its rhetorical value, humor is often overemphasized and misplaced at the expense of subject content. For exam- ple, mitosis is presented in cartoon form as a cell with a head and face. The sole description of the molecular events of telophase are...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 1997; 598502–506 doi: https://doi.org/10.2307/4450365
Published: 01 October 1997
.... Figure 5. Prophase II. Figure 6. Metaphase II. Figure 7. Anaphase II. Figure 8. Telophase II. Grasses Several members of the grass family (Poaceae) are suited for meiotic studies: these include rye (Se- cale cereale L.) (Figures 9, 10) and bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L both of which have flowers...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 1997; 595300–304 doi: https://doi.org/10.2307/4450313
Published: 01 May 1997
... 1. Meiosis in Tradescantia: a. zygonema, b. late pachynema, early diplonema, c. diakinesis, d. metaphase I, e. metaphase I going into anaphase I, f. anaphase I, g. late anaphase I, h. late telophase I, i. early prophase II, j. late prophase II, k. metaphase II, 1. late anaphase II. Photographs by...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 1992; 548470–474 doi: https://doi.org/10.2307/4449552
Published: 01 November 1992
... information in the nucleus is AAaaBBbb. This nucleus is then traced through prophase, the end of metaphase (when the chromosomes are aligned on the equatorial plane), anaphase and telophase of mitosis. The student draws the spindle in appropriate cells, using a pencil of contrasting color. Genes (Ala and Bib...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 1990; 528500–503 doi: https://doi.org/10.2307/4449187
Published: 01 November 1990
... separating the middle and index fingers of each hand into a V- or Churchill "victory" position, illustrating the separation of chromatids (Figure 4). Telophase Telophase is shown by indicating to the students that the middle finger of the upper hand and the index finger of the lower hand would be chromo...