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Possible outcomes of the “lady <b>tasting</b> tea” experiment.   Figure 2. Possibl...
Published: 01 October 2019
Figure 2. Possible outcomes of the “lady tasting tea” experiment. Figure 2. Possible outcomes of the “lady tasting tea” experiment. Figure 2. Possible outcomes of the “lady tasting tea” experiment. Figure 2. Possible outcomes of the “lady tasting tea” experiment. More
Images
Drawing of <b>taste</b> sensitivity on the human tongue. “Approximate location on ...
Published: 01 October 2013
Figure 2. Drawing of taste sensitivity on the human tongue. “Approximate location on the tongue of regions of greatest taste sensitivities for the four primary taste qualities. For the bitter taste, the soft palate (not shown) is the most sensitive region” ( Schiffman, 1995 ). Figure 2 Figure 2. Drawing of taste sensitivity on the human tongue. “Approximate location on the tongue of regions of greatest taste sensitivities for the four primary taste qualities. For the bitter taste, the soft palate (not shown) is the most sensitive region” ( Schiffman, 1995 ). Figure 2 More
Images
Log <b>taste</b> thresholds of four tongue loci and the soft palate for urea, sodi...
Published: 01 October 2013
Figure 4. Log taste thresholds of four tongue loci and the soft palate for urea, sodium chloride, sucrose, citric acid, and quinine hydrochloride. The horizontal lines indicate ±SE. Quinine is bitter, sucrose is table sugar, citric acid is vitamin C (sour), and urea tastes like ammonia. The y Figure 4. Log taste thresholds of four tongue loci and the soft palate for urea, sodium chloride, sucrose, citric acid, and quinine hydrochloride. The horizontal lines indicate ±SE. Quinine is bitter, sucrose is table sugar, citric acid is vitamin C (sour), and urea tastes like ammonia. The y More
Images
Distribution of <b>taste</b> sensitivity along the edge of the tongue ( Boring, 19...
Published: 01 October 2013
Figure 1. Distribution of taste sensitivity along the edge of the tongue ( Boring, 1942 , p. 452). Figure 1. Distribution of taste sensitivity along the edge of the tongue (Boring, 1942, p. 452). Figure 1. Distribution of taste sensitivity along the edge of the tongue ( Boring, 1942 , p. 452). Figure 1. Distribution of taste sensitivity along the edge of the tongue (Boring, 1942, p. 452). More
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2019; 818535–542 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2019.81.8.535
Published: 01 October 2019
...Figure 2. Possible outcomes of the “lady tasting tea” experiment. Figure 2. Possible outcomes of the “lady tasting tea” experiment. ...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2016; 78162–66 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2016.78.1.62
Published: 01 January 2016
...Matthew M. Graziose Research into human eating behavior is complex. Innate preferences for sweet and aversions to bitter tastes may explain why we choose certain foods. Some segments of the population, called “supertasters,” are more sensitive to bitter-tasting foods because of a genetic...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 1989; 517440–443 doi: https://doi.org/10.2307/4448976
Published: 01 October 1989
... 1979 BIology Today Matters of Taste & Style Maura Flannery Department Editor Right now, frizzy hair and large ear- rings are "in" with the girls in my classes, while the boys are "into" 4-by-4s and t-shirts. When I was in school the "frizzies" were considered a social disaster, and cars were sup...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2019; 812110–114 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2019.81.2.110
Published: 01 February 2019
... make pancakes (representing offspring) with various ingredients (illustrating genetic diversity and allelic variation), other students (representing the environment) judge the pancakes on the basis of taste. Only the highest-ranking pancakes are made in a second generation (illustrating population...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 1977; 393165–167 doi: https://doi.org/10.2307/4445846
Published: 01 March 1977
... forgotten art of flower cookery 1973 Acquiring a Taste for Biology Sister Carolyn Capuano EVERY TEACHER KNOWS THAT learning is multi- faceted and, acting on this, he or she works to present material, stimulate appreciation, or aid investigative dis- covery in as many ways as possible. Touching many...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 1945; 76136–140 doi: https://doi.org/10.2307/4437609
Published: 01 March 1945
..., 1935. 10.2307/86857 78 3 BLAKESLEE, A. F., AND Fox, A. J., Jour. of Hered., Vol. 23, pp. 96-107, 1932. Blakeslee 96 23 Jour. of Hered. 1932 4 BLAKESLEE, A. F., Sci. Monthly, Vol. 41, pp. 72-84, 1935. 10.2307/15927 72 Teachers Talk Too Much A Taste Demonstration vs. A Talk...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 1943; 6119–20 doi: https://doi.org/10.2307/4437435
Published: 01 October 1943
...Helen Drugg 19431 Teaclhing by Taste 19 TEACHING B3Y TASTE Recalling amiionig our most enjoyable and educational class activities of the past year the pupils always mention the Apple Day program. The class cele- brated Apple Day oni October 30, 1942. A few davs prior to this date each pupil was...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 1997; 592108–112 doi: https://doi.org/10.2307/4450259
Published: 01 February 1997
... How-To-Do-It rotein Potluck: Doing Tasteful Science David T. Crowther Jim Landon Kathleen Jacobitz O VER the past several de- cades concepts in cell and molecular biology have be- come central themes in the study of life science. New discoveries, espe- cially in the areas of DNA sequenc- ing and...
Images
Student's poster showing the selected figures from four modules to link thr...
Published: 01 November 2018
Figure 6. Student's poster showing the selected figures from four modules to link three organ systems for the actions of cranial sensory and motor functions: smell, vision, eyelid and eyeball movement, chewing, taste, facial expression, salivation, equilibrium and hearing, swallowing, taste, and Figure 6. Student's poster showing the selected figures from four modules to link three organ systems for the actions of cranial sensory and motor functions: smell, vision, eyelid and eyeball movement, chewing, taste, facial expression, salivation, equilibrium and hearing, swallowing, taste, and More
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2015; 778620–623 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2015.77.8.9
Published: 01 October 2015
... carbohydrate concepts that might otherwise seem disparate to students. For example, the taste of a banana is linked to carbohydrate hydrolysis, as well as to organelle content within banana cells. Bananas can be used safely in any classroom, and inquiry-based learning can be used to progress through related...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2019; 818592 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2019.81.8.592
Published: 01 October 2019
.... Von Frisch used both observation and training to uncover aspects of animal behavior, including the senses of taste and sound in fishes; the senses of color, smell, and taste in bees; and, of course, the famous communication dances of honeybees. Several experiments are described in detail, emphasizing...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2019; 817524–525 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2019.81.7.524a
Published: 01 September 2019
... Golden Autumn Cricket Festival in China. (17) Become aware of surprising experiments with bedbugs. (18) Finally, enjoy the taste of entomophagy, dining on insects in highly nutritious meals, perhaps Wax Moth Tacos, Three Bee Salad, or even Sweet 'n' Sour Summer June Bugs. Bon Appétit! This book will...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2019; 814229–233 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2019.81.4.229
Published: 01 April 2019
... pictures and picking up fruit from the ground, weighing it in their hands, smelling it repeatedly, trying to open the fruit, or dropping it on the ground to listen to the sound. One student wanted to know how the plant could be grown from seed. Others asked whether they could taste the fruit, indicating a...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2019; 814278–283 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2019.81.4.278
Published: 01 April 2019
... human skin and eyes; however, there has never been an instance of people being seriously harmed by millipedes. If the millipede secretions do come into contact with skin or eyes, use an eyewash station to rinse eyes, and soap and water to clean exposed skin. Do not taste millipedes! Millipedes can be...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2019; 813146–150 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2019.81.3.146
Published: 01 March 2019
... without a mobile agent are evident from pods piling up near the trunk in urban spaces. Names like “honey locust,” “sweet locust,” and “honey shuck” apparently refer to the fruit pulp's sweetish taste. The pulp can contain up to 14% sugars ( Allen & Allen, 1981 , p. 299) and was used by Native American...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2019; 812139–140 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2019.81.2.139
Published: 01 February 2019
... evolutionary lens of discovery and development, answering the questions of where our tastes for these elements originated, the pathways by which we have learned our trades in food, and the mechanisms that drive some of the traits that make our choices unique. I love the concept of “evolutionary gastronomy...