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simulation

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Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2020; 825323–327 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2020.82.5.323
Published: 01 May 2020
... populations or communities is also important. I developed a simulation that allows participants to actively explore the value of herd immunity in controlling the spread of infectious disease, first by considering how quickly an entire population may become ill if no one has immunity, and then after...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2019; 812127–132 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2019.81.2.127
Published: 01 February 2019
...Christopher W. Hoagstrom; Lin Xiang; Nicole Lewis-Rogers; Patrice K. Connors; Ami Sessions-Robinson; John F. Mull Active-learning approaches can improve understanding of core biological concepts. We describe a revised hands-on simulation for teaching evolution by natural selection, which focuses on...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2017; 797552–561 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2017.79.7.552
Published: 01 September 2017
...Lace A. Svec Undergraduate introductory biology students at the university level often struggle to trace movement of matter and energy through catabolic and anabolic processes in biological systems. A sequential guided simulation of cellular respiration and photosynthesis provides students an...
Images
<b>Simulation</b> 1: progression of a hypothetical disease with  R  o  = 3 through...
Published: 01 May 2020
Figure 1. Simulation 1: progression of a hypothetical disease with R o = 3 through a community with no immunity. Round 1: cumulative incidence = 12%, prevalence = 12%. Round 2: cumulative incidence = 40.91%, prevalence = 48%. Round 3: cumulative incidence = 100%, prevalence = 100%. Figure 1. Simulation 1: progression of a hypothetical disease with R o = 3 through a community with no immunity. Round 1: cumulative incidence = 12%, prevalence = 12%. Round 2: cumulative incidence = 40.91%, prevalence = 48%. Round 3: cumulative incidence = 100%, prevalence = 100%. More
Images
<b>Simulation</b> 2: introduction of a hypothetical disease with  R  o  = 3 to a c...
Published: 01 May 2020
Figure 2. Simulation 2: introduction of a hypothetical disease with R o = 3 to a community with 80% of the population immunized against the pathogen (shown as light gray squares). The population at risk would be only the five unprotected individuals shown as dark gray squares. In three Figure 2. Simulation 2: introduction of a hypothetical disease with R o = 3 to a community with 80% of the population immunized against the pathogen (shown as light gray squares). The population at risk would be only the five unprotected individuals shown as dark gray squares. In three More
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2017; 794301–304 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2017.79.4.301
Published: 01 April 2017
... introduction and implementation in the high school biology classroom. We present a reliable yet inexpensive way of effectively simulating this assay, allowing student exposure to several advanced topics, including immunodetection, clinical diagnostics, and qualitative and quantitative colorimetric analysis...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2017; 792128–134 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2017.79.2.128
Published: 01 February 2017
... alleviate this problem. In this guided investigation of evolutionary mechanisms, students use LEGO bricks to simulate how mutation, migration, genetic drift, and natural selection can affect the evolution of a population. This exercise was undertaken and assessed with college introductory biology students...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2019; 819665–667 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2019.81.9.665
Published: 01 December 2019
...Keith W. Pecor Genetic drift is an important mechanism in microevolution, but it can be more challenging to understand than other mechanisms (e.g., natural selection). This group project allows students to simulate random changes in allelic frequencies over generational time using a few simple...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2015; 776445–451 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2015.77.6.445
Published: 01 August 2015
... students to “develop a cumulative, coherent, and usable understanding of science and engineering.” DNA, proteins, enzymes, genetics, and human disease are taught together through the story of patients with Pompe disease as students engage in a simulated clinical assay and genetic analysis and present their...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2014; 767456–458 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2014.76.7.7
Published: 01 September 2014
... critical that students leave an introductory biology course with a proficient understanding of these metabolic pathways. This activity/simulation is designed to give students a first-hand, interactive view of the functioning of the electron transport chain and chemiosmosis that occurs during aerobic...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2014; 762132–136 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2014.76.2.11
Published: 01 February 2014
... hundred per lecture section. We present a pedagogically sound exercise that utilizes a series of simple and inexpensive simulations to convey the concept of evolution through mutation and natural selection. Questions after each simulation expand student comprehension; a class discussion encourages...
Images
Traditional <b>simulation</b> of natural selection, focusing on phenotypic change ...
Published: 01 February 2018
Figure 1. Traditional simulation of natural selection, focusing on phenotypic change alone (e.g., Stebbins &amp; Allen, 1975 ). Differently adapted organisms are represented by colored chips spread out over a piece of fabric, which represents the habitat. Figure 1. Traditional simulation of Figure 1. Traditional simulation of natural selection, focusing on phenotypic change alone (e.g., Stebbins &amp; Allen, 1975 ). Differently adapted organisms are represented by colored chips spread out over a piece of fabric, which represents the habitat. Figure 1. Traditional simulation of More
Images
New <b>simulation</b>, described in this paper, focusing on both phenotypic change...
Published: 01 February 2018
Figure 2. New simulation, described in this paper, focusing on both phenotypic change (shrinking body size of Atlantic cod) and changes in allele frequencies due to size-selective harvesting ( www.evolution-of-life.com and Jördens et al., 2016 ). Figure 2. New simulation, described in this Figure 2. New simulation, described in this paper, focusing on both phenotypic change (shrinking body size of Atlantic cod) and changes in allele frequencies due to size-selective harvesting ( www.evolution-of-life.com and Jördens et al., 2016 ). Figure 2. New simulation, described in this More
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2020; 822114–119 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2020.82.2.114
Published: 01 February 2020
... observe, and computer simulations do not always result in a clear understanding of evolutionary principles. Recently, the Avida-ED software has been developed to simulate evolution in a laboratory setting. Unlike other simulations, Avida-ED allows students to manipulate the environment, change the...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2013; 754274–279 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2013.75.4.9
Published: 01 April 2013
..., overexploitation, and climate change – can disrupt an ecosystem and threaten the survival of some species. ( NRC, 2012 , pp. 155–156) Simulation logistic growth model integration biology mathematics In Excel 2007, open a new document. In Cell A1, type “Parameter”; in B1, type “Value”; in D1...
Images
An example of a completed <b>simulation</b>. Generations 8 through 96 are not show...
Published: 01 October 2017
Figure 2. An example of a completed simulation. Generations 8 through 96 are not shown to save space. Highlighted cells indicate where students can manipulate the simulation. Figure 2. An example of a completed simulation. Generations 8 through 96 are not shown to save space. Highlighted cells Figure 2. An example of a completed simulation. Generations 8 through 96 are not shown to save space. Highlighted cells indicate where students can manipulate the simulation. Figure 2. An example of a completed simulation. Generations 8 through 96 are not shown to save space. Highlighted cells More
Images
<b>Simulation</b> packet game pieces. The printed images can be used to generate l...
Published: 01 September 2017
Figure 1. Simulation packet game pieces. The printed images can be used to generate laminated pieces for the simulation. The number of each piece required for the simulation is indicated in Table 3 . For a printable version of this figure, please send an email request to lacesvec Figure 1. Simulation packet game pieces. The printed images can be used to generate laminated pieces for the simulation. The number of each piece required for the simulation is indicated in Table 3 . For a printable version of this figure, please send an email request to lacesvec More
Images
Layout of the <b>simulation</b> as it appears in the accompanying Google Sheets te...
Published: 01 October 2017
Figure 1. Layout of the simulation as it appears in the accompanying Google Sheets template ( N = 10). Sections are labeled in the order they are to be completed by students: (1) starting population; (2) (reproductive advantage of A)/(reproductive advantage of a); (3) cumulative Figure 1. Layout of the simulation as it appears in the accompanying Google Sheets template ( N = 10). Sections are labeled in the order they are to be completed by students: (1) starting population; (2) (reproductive advantage of A)/(reproductive advantage of a); (3) cumulative More
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2018; 805385–389 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2018.80.5.385
Published: 01 May 2018
... developed a hands-on, discussion-based activity for the middle school science classroom to demonstrate biomagnification and connect it to food webs and trophic pyramids. Each student represents an aquatic organism, and together students simulate the consumption and excretion processes in an aquatic food...
Includes: Supplementary data
Images
Visual summary of the <b>simulation</b> procedure for photosynthesis. Students wil...
Published: 01 September 2017
Figure 3. Visual summary of the simulation procedure for photosynthesis. Students will manipulate game pieces and energy stickers to depict transformation of matter and energy in each step. The written equations and instructions under each image can be provided to the students during the Figure 3. Visual summary of the simulation procedure for photosynthesis. Students will manipulate game pieces and energy stickers to depict transformation of matter and energy in each step. The written equations and instructions under each image can be provided to the students during the More