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seasonal-habitat-use

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Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (2019) 81 (5): 334–339.
Published: 01 May 2019
... ask a variety of research questions, such as comparison of predation in nearby habitats (park vs. backyard), vegetation (tree vs. shrub), season (spring vs. fall), or coloration (aposematic vs. camouflage). For many students, this may be one of few opportunities at the high school level to investigate...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (2020) 82 (4): 241–246.
Published: 01 April 2020
... determine whether they are associated with plant taxa at any given level (order, family, genus) of resolution. Habitat type (xeric, hydric, edge, forest type, etc.) could also be used as variables. These questions can be answered statistically with (1) t -tests or analysis of variance (ANOVA), two...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (2020) 82 (4): 247–255.
Published: 01 April 2020
... heat primarily via evaporative water loss through transpiration. In order to maintain ideal temperatures in the diverse habitats that plants occupy, plants have evolved a variety of leaf traits that influence their ability to capture and lose heat, including variation in leaf surface area, leaf margin...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (2020) 82 (3): 142–148.
Published: 01 March 2020
... in a single semester. Use data from multiple years Analyze previous year's data while setting up and processing current year C. 8. Allow different levels of commitment. Multiple faculty per institution divide labor Some institutions work in only one habitat C. 9. Outsource...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (2020) 82 (2): 104–112.
Published: 01 February 2020
... pigmentation. The codominant nature of both mutated and wild-type Mc1r alleles resulted in a spectrum of fur color, and the prevalence of a specific fur color in an individual population reflected habitat substrate ( Mullen et al., 2009 ). Allelic frequencies of fur colors that matched the habitat's...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (2019) 81 (7): 492–501.
Published: 01 September 2019
... Surveillance System (NNDSS; https://wwwn.cdc.gov/nndss/ ) and from annual health reports that are released by public health departments. Additionally, students can explore environmental parameters that characterize the habitat of Coccidioides by using the WebSoilSurvey (WSS) database of the U.S. Department...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (2019) 81 (6): 417–422.
Published: 01 August 2019
.... Next, students read Fischer's (1960) seminal work and see how Fischer identified an ultimate cause of the greater species richness in the tropics as the intertwined processes of evolution of species and evolution of habitats. They also come to understand how Fischer (1960) explored more specific...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (2019) 81 (4): 234–241.
Published: 01 April 2019
... exposed to and had practice with inferential statistical tests like Student's t -test, they may be interested in a more rigorous comparison of the Shannon index for the two habitats. In 1970, Hutcheson developed a version of the t -test to use with the Shannon model ( Hutcheson, 1970 ), our Equation 4...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (2019) 81 (4): 242–247.
Published: 01 April 2019
... plant species are spread by humans. In the case of water hyacinth, these plants can affect the biodiversity of a habitat by pushing out native species and impeding human use of the area by blocking navigation and water control structures. Practices Within This Activity MS-LS2-4: Construct an...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (2019) 81 (1): 40–46.
Published: 01 January 2019
... exploration of Hoodia can provide an interdisciplinary approach to understanding the nature of science. Students can use maps and the observations of scientists to explore the plant's habitats, chemistry, and biology. Table 3 includes some guiding questions and resources for the classroom. While some...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (2018) 80 (8): 572–576.
Published: 01 October 2018
..., mitigate storm-water runoff, and provide food and habitat for other organisms. Using the cross-platform and open-source software Bioimages Collection Manager (BCM), we created an online interactive arboretum guide for a university campus arboretum. Faculty, students, and visitors can scan tree tags with...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (2018) 80 (5): 353–358.
Published: 01 May 2018
.... The Living World Wetland and marsh areas may provide ecosystem services to cities, including water purification.  C. Ecosystem Diversity III. Population As human populations grow they require more natural resources, which can contribute to habitat destruction.  B. Human Population   3...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (2018) 80 (4): 272–277.
Published: 01 April 2018
... ). Because flies in chill coma cannot move to disperse, find mates, court, feed, or avoid predators, it is thought that the ability to recover quickly from chill coma is adaptive in seasonal habitats where flies may experience cold temperatures overnight that warm quickly in the morning. Chill coma recovery...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (2017) 79 (9): 769–773.
Published: 01 November 2017
... integrated all theories (Meta-Challenge). Note the breadth of each question, which generates discussion about meaning, scale, and feasibility in research questions and process. All Bodies of Theory Represented Hydrology theory Climate change theory Disturbance theory Habitat...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (2017) 79 (7): 592–593.
Published: 01 September 2017
... information such as search times and search effort, habitat descriptions, general conditions, project members. Note that the students’ Trainer Level should be recorded for each capture, as the Trainer Level has an effect on capture attributes (see below). From a single sampling event, students would be able...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (2017) 79 (6): 466–472.
Published: 01 August 2017
... small organisms commonly found in local waters. Instructors have an opportunity to describe the features and habitats of many of the organisms observed. Self-sustaining ecosystem microcosms, called ecosystem jars, are easily obtained from local ponds and streams. These miniature ecosystems can...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (2017) 79 (5): 412–416.
Published: 01 May 2017
...—design a project to test the diversity of insects and/or frogs in habitats at different latitudes, elevations, etc. 3-LS4-2 Use evidence to construct an explanation for how the variations in characteristics among individuals of the same species may provide advantages in surviving, finding mates...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (2017) 79 (3): 225–232.
Published: 01 March 2017
... answer a scientific question. The ability to understand the relationship between science and society: Students build competency in this area by using the EPT taxa and riparian spiders as indices to assess habitat quality and overall health of a stream or river. Name and describe the different...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (2017) 79 (3): 169–173.
Published: 01 March 2017
... cycle, student must decide which habitats are breeding grounds and must be cleared. From this game, students learn how climate change and human behaviors can influence the spread of mosquito-borne diseases. “Blood Suckers and Climate” is a jigsaw activity to help students understand greenhouse...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (2017) 79 (1): 64–67.
Published: 01 January 2017
... ratio. They are described in general as being rather sluggish ( Stebbins, 1951 ), which suggests a comparatively low metabolic rate. The main factor that enables these species to survive is their habitat: fast-running, turbulent, cold (and hence oxygen-rich) water. Their appendages, though surely...