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Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2019; 816423–429 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2019.81.6.423
Published: 01 August 2019
... bioinformatics and computer modeling, in the context of rational drug design, using free online resources such as databases and computer programs. Through the process of learning about computational drug design and drug optimization, students also learn content such as elements of protein structure and protein...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2018; 809642–648 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2018.80.9.642
Published: 01 November 2018
...Timothy P. Brady That genes are indispensable is indisputable but that they are the source of information for protein synthesis—to the extent reflected by statements such as “genes are blueprints for proteins” or “genomes constitute developmental programs”—is challenged by discoveries such as post...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2018; 805379–384 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2018.80.5.379
Published: 01 May 2018
...Kwok-chi Lau; Anthony Hiu-Fung Lo; Kam-bo Wong The study adapts Anfinsen's Nobel-winning experiment of protein folding into biology investigation for secondary and college students. This experiment is significant for secondary and college science learning not only for its associations with some...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2018; 80121–28 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2018.80.1.21
Published: 01 January 2018
... and logically solve complex science and engineering problems. In this article, we share a successful lesson using protein synthesis to teach CT. This lesson focuses primarily on modeling and simulation practices with an extension activity focusing on the computational problem-solving practices of CT...
Images
The <b>Protein</b> Folding Game, simulating globular <b>protein</b> folding and hydrophob...
Published: 01 April 2017
Figure 7. The Protein Folding Game, simulating globular protein folding and hydrophobic collapse. Students fold the “polypeptide” (pipe cleaner) to maximize the number of polar amino acids (white beads) exposed on the surface and nonpolar amino acids (black beads) buried internally to form a Figure 7. The Protein Folding Game, simulating globular protein folding and hydrophobic collapse. Students fold the “polypeptide” (pipe cleaner) to maximize the number of polar amino acids (white beads) exposed on the surface and nonpolar amino acids (black beads) buried internally to form a More
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2011; 737382–387 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2011.73.7.3
Published: 01 September 2011
... purple (red-violet) flowers and gray seed coat, whereas the a allele results in white flowers and white seed coat. © 2011 by National Association of Biology Teachers 2011 Gregor Mendel garden peas meiosis genes code for proteins enzymes determine phenotype...
Images
Coding sequence of the green fluorescent <b>protein</b> (GFP) gene.
Published: 01 May 2020
Figure 4. Coding sequence of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene. Figure 4. Coding sequence of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene. More
Images
Coding sequence of the green fluorescent <b>protein</b> (GFP) gene with CRISPR tar...
Published: 01 May 2020
Figure 9. Coding sequence of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene with CRISPR target sequences highlighted. Figure 9. Coding sequence of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene with CRISPR target sequences highlighted. More
Images
Coding sequence of the red fluorescent <b>protein</b> (RFP) gene.
Published: 01 May 2020
Figure 10. Coding sequence of the red fluorescent protein (RFP) gene. Figure 10. Coding sequence of the red fluorescent protein (RFP) gene. More
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2013; 753211–213 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2013.75.3.10
Published: 01 March 2013
...Michelle L. LaBonte The process of protein translation and translocation into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) can often be challenging for introductory college biology students to visualize. To help them understand how proteins become oriented in the ER membrane, I developed a hands-on activity in...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2012; 748581–582 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2012.74.8.9
Published: 01 October 2012
...Jeanne Ting Chowning; Dina Kovarik; Joan Griswold Figure 1. Pencil transferase model used to illustrate impacts of mutations on protein structure. Figure 1. Pencil transferase model used to illustrate impacts of mutations on protein structure. Figure 2. Sample “pencil...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2012; 744250–255 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2012.74.4.8
Published: 01 April 2012
...Chris Eurich; Peter A. Fields; Elizabeth Rice Proteomics is an emerging area of systems biology that allows simultaneous study of thousands of proteins expressed in cells, tissues, or whole organisms. We have developed this activity to enable high school or college students to explore proteomic...
Images
<b>Protein</b> Data Bank summary page for cyclooxygenase (PDB ID 1PTH).   Figure 4...
Published: 01 August 2019
Figure 4. Protein Data Bank summary page for cyclooxygenase (PDB ID 1PTH). Figure 4. Protein Data Bank summary page for cyclooxygenase (PDB ID 1PTH). Figure 4. Protein Data Bank summary page for cyclooxygenase (PDB ID 1PTH). Figure 4. Protein Data Bank summary page for cyclooxygenase (PDB ID 1PTH). More
Images
Example of the Ligand View program output that shows the <b>protein</b> residues f...
Published: 01 August 2019
Figure 5. Example of the Ligand View program output that shows the protein residues forming interactions with the bound ligand. Figure 5. Example of the Ligand View program output that shows the protein residues forming interactions with the bound ligand. Figure 5. Example of the Ligand View program output that shows the protein residues forming interactions with the bound ligand. Figure 5. Example of the Ligand View program output that shows the protein residues forming interactions with the bound ligand. More
Images
The hierarchical nature of <b>protein</b> structure. ( A ) Amino acids and peptide...
Published: 01 August 2019
Figure 3. The hierarchical nature of protein structure. ( A ) Amino acids and peptide bonds form a protein chain. ( B ) Backbone folds to form secondary structural elements (alpha-helices and beta-strands) with side chains “hanging.” ( C ) Tertiary structure showing the conformation of the Figure 3. The hierarchical nature of protein structure. ( A ) Amino acids and peptide bonds form a protein chain. ( B ) Backbone folds to form secondary structural elements (alpha-helices and beta-strands) with side chains “hanging.” ( C ) Tertiary structure showing the conformation of the More
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2010; 729564–566 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2010.72.9.8
Published: 01 November 2010
.... 81 Factual comprehension 5. Explain what exons and introns are. 77 Factual comprehension Incomplete == 31 6. Briefly summarize the steps involved in protein synthesis. Complete == 50 (with details) Unacceptable == 19 Application of factual knowledge 7. A segment of DNA sense...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2010; 72137–39 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2010.72.1.9
Published: 01 January 2010
...Rongsun Pu This article describes how to use protein extraction, quantification, and analysis in the undergraduate teaching laboratory to engage students in inquiry-based, discovery-driven learning. Detailed instructions for obtaining proteins from animal tissues, using BCA assay to quantify the...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2017; 794257–271 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2017.79.4.257
Published: 01 April 2017
...Figure 7. The Protein Folding Game, simulating globular protein folding and hydrophobic collapse. Students fold the “polypeptide” (pipe cleaner) to maximize the number of polar amino acids (white beads) exposed on the surface and nonpolar amino acids (black beads) buried internally to form a...
Images
General structure of a G-<b>protein</b>-coupled receptor. A typical G-<b>protein</b>-coup...
Published: 01 November 2013
Figure 5. General structure of a G-protein-coupled receptor. A typical G-protein-coupled receptor is a single amino acid chain in the cell membrane. The free amino end of the protein is on the outside of the cell; the free carboxyl end is on the inside of the cell. The protein crosses the cell Figure 5. General structure of a G-protein-coupled receptor. A typical G-protein-coupled receptor is a single amino acid chain in the cell membrane. The free amino end of the protein is on the outside of the cell; the free carboxyl end is on the inside of the cell. The protein crosses the cell More
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2007; 69138–40 doi: https://doi.org/10.2307/4452080
Published: 01 January 2007
... August 28 1 The Mobile Register 1998 U H ::I 0 - 0- H- 0 Protein Structure ELAINE GARBARINO ASMUS In Stanley Miller's classic 1953 experiment, amino acids were among the first molecules to form in solu- tion as a result of the electrification of a reducing atmo- sphere. The week-long experiment...