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pollen-germination

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Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 1992; 543168–169 doi: https://doi.org/10.2307/4449439
Published: 01 March 1992
...David J. Schimpf Copyright 1992 National Association of Biology Teachers References Bilderback, D.E. (1981). Impatiens pollen germination and tube growth as a bioas- say for toxic substances. Environmental Health Perspectives, 37, 95-103. 10.2307/3429256 95 Esau, K. (1965). Plant...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2019; 819626–635 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2019.81.9.626
Published: 01 December 2019
..., such as that corn plants had “male” and “female” structures. Other students made explicit references to pollination (“You have to take some pollen from a blue corn and you have to mix it with the yellow one to make it yellow and blue” [student 107]) and fertilization (“The pollen gets on kind of like...
Images
Semi- in vivo  assay demonstrating <b>pollen</b> tube targeting in fast-cycling  B...
Published: 01 October 2012
Figure 3. Semi- in vivo assay demonstrating pollen tube targeting in fast-cycling Brassica rapa. (A) Excised ovule of a Brassica rapa pistil. The dashed line indicates the position of the embryo sac, which is visible only in sections of fixed tissue. (B) Germinating pollen grain on a stigma Figure 3. Semi- in vivo assay demonstrating pollen tube targeting in fast-cycling Brassica rapa. (A) Excised ovule of a Brassica rapa pistil. The dashed line indicates the position of the embryo sac, which is visible only in sections of fixed tissue. (B) Germinating pollen grain on a stigma More
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2018; 804291–300 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2018.80.4.291
Published: 01 April 2018
..., anther, pollen Use scissors to carefully remove the dry siliques of successful gl1-1 × Col-1 crosses (F1 generation) and place them in an Eppendorf tube, one silique per tube. Close tubes and label with the group number or name, plant number, generation (F1), and the type of cross. Tap the...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2018; 805365–369 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2018.80.5.365
Published: 01 May 2018
.... For example, during pollination, a bee feeds on the nectar of a flower and consequently transports pollen from flower to flower, promoting plant reproduction. Another example is seed dispersal: a bird feeds on fruits and then deposits plant seeds in its excreta in places where they may germinate. The...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2017; 794329–330 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2017.79.4.329a
Published: 01 April 2017
... alignment with science teaching standards. The bulk of the book consists of an exploration of flower and fruit biology told through the story of the young reader's investigations with Mr. Ty and Mrs. Maria, both former teachers. They guide the young scientist through flower anatomy, pollen and...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2016; 787613–614 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2016.78.7.613
Published: 01 September 2016
..., and ovules are fertilized; elsewhere in this book, ovaries are fertilized and flowers are fertilized. Now just exactly where is this male gamete going, and with what does it actually join? Will students understand “diploid sporophyte pollen grains are undergoing meiosis to form a haploid...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2012; 748575–580 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2012.74.8.8
Published: 01 October 2012
...Figure 3. Semi- in vivo assay demonstrating pollen tube targeting in fast-cycling Brassica rapa. (A) Excised ovule of a Brassica rapa pistil. The dashed line indicates the position of the embryo sac, which is visible only in sections of fixed tissue. (B) Germinating pollen grain on a stigma...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2012; 749667–671 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2012.74.9.14
Published: 01 November 2012
... Phylogenetics.......................4:244-I, 5:332-H Phytophthora ramorum .......................3:191-Q Plant–animal interactions.......................7:509-I Pollen germination.......................8:575-H Pollution.......................7:479-I Polymerase chain reaction (PCR...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2013; 753194–201 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2013.75.3.8
Published: 01 March 2013
... biological information about the six plant species in the game, allowing students to extrapolate the biology of their species from experiences and interactions during game play. Resources that plants need to survive, such as light, water, certain soils and nutrients, and a way to disperse their pollen...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2009; 714235–244 doi: https://doi.org/10.2307/27669417
Published: 01 April 2009
... tractable with many physical attributes that make study quite easy. For example, the (typically) perfect flowers have large parts for ease of study. Anthers produce abun dant pollen that can be readily collected and germinated. Plants quickly begin to flower in 10-12 weeks from seed; the fruit develops...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2010; 723172–175 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2010.72.3.8
Published: 01 March 2010
... easily transfer pollen to newly opened flowers. Once pollinated, seeds will develop within pods called ““siliques”” that can be harvested at plant senescence. At this time, students can determine the collective number and weight of seeds per treatment group to compare the reproductive output of plants...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2009; 715300–304 doi: https://doi.org/10.2307/27669435
Published: 01 May 2009
... Botany, 91(8), 1260-1264. Van Vliet, A. J. H., Overeem, A., De Groot, R. S., Jacobs, A. F. G. &amp; Spieksma, F. T. M. (2002). The influence of temperature and climate change on the timing of pollen release in the Netherlands. International Journal of Climatology, 22(14), 1757-1767. U U.-A kX...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2008; 706345–349 doi: https://doi.org/10.2307/30163294
Published: 01 August 2008
... insures natural self-fertilization. He knew how to remove the anthers from a flower before its own pollen is shed, and how to trans- fer pollen from another plant onto the stigma to create hybrid seeds. He knew the role of ovules (Mendel called them "germinal cells") and pollen cells in fertilization. "[P...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2006; 686372–375 doi: https://doi.org/10.2307/4452016
Published: 01 August 2006
... plants, pollen does not germinate unless the host stigma is of a different genetic type, determined by specific sterility alleles. Mating strains may regulate inbreeding and promote out- crossing. Tetrahymena thermophila, a protozoan, has seven mating strains. Schizophyllum commune, a mushroom, has over...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2006; 68292–97 doi: https://doi.org/10.2307/4451938
Published: 01 February 2006
... Some plants do not begin as seeds, i.e., potatoes, onions, and carrots Bees carry pollen Male and female parts to a plant All plants die Some plants produce fruit Some plants are annuals and others are longer All plants have chloroplast Reproduce with spores Seed Structure Hard coating provides...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2003; 656409–417 doi: https://doi.org/10.2307/4451528
Published: 01 August 2003
..., students, as an example, correlate their recordings on microspores, male gametophytes, and pollen grain germination to the events of mitosis, meiosis, and fertilization. As another example, they compare sporo- phyte structures (e.g., sporangium, microsporangium, megasporangium, pollen sac, ovule) to...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 1994; 563174–175 doi: https://doi.org/10.2307/4449783
Published: 01 March 1994
...Robert Tatina; Kevin Hohn Copyright 1994 National Association of Biology Teachers References Brewbaker, J.L. & Kwack, B.H. (1963). The essential role of calcium ion in pollen germination and pollen tube growth. American Journal of Botany, 50(9), 747-758. Brewbaker 9 747 50...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2002; 649696–701 doi: https://doi.org/10.2307/4451412
Published: 01 November 2002
... Russell devotes several chapters to how insects, birds, and other mammals are attracted to flowers and the floral devices that ensure they leave with a load of pollen. While there is hardly a one-to-one correspondence between the chapters in Russell's book with those in Bernhardt's, he does cover pretty...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2000; 624297–302 doi: https://doi.org/10.2307/4450900
Published: 01 April 2000
... and fruit for study. Corn plants have male flowers (the tassels) at the top and female flowers (the silks) along the stem, where the corn cobs form. A corn cob is actually a cluster of fruits! Botanically speaking, each ker- nel is a fruit called a grain, containing one seed. Pollen from the tassel...