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Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2020; 82149–51 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2020.82.1.49
Published: 01 January 2020
... replication, transcription, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and random mutations so that students can examine these processes in detail. The set is inexpensive and easy to make, has been used successfully, and allows for modification to fit individual teachers' needs. Figure 1. Components of the set: (1...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2015; 773211–214 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2015.77.3.10
Published: 01 March 2015
... red and white onions bought from a local grocery store. A lack of red coloration in white onions is a result of one or more mutations in the color production pathway. This mutation can be seen by the use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) followed by gel electrophoresis. An absence of an amplified PCR...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2011; 736331–335 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2011.73.6.5
Published: 01 August 2011
... successfully engaged students, reinforced theoretical information presented in lectures, provided our students with valuable and current molecular technique exposure, and made molecular microbiology personally meaningful and exciting. Figure 5. Dirty PCR using fungal and bacterial colonies as template...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 1997; 593172–178 doi: https://doi.org/10.2307/4450275
Published: 01 March 1997
...A. Malcolm Campbell; John H. Williamson; Diane Padula; Steve Sundby Copyright 1996 The National Association of Biology Teachers References Budowle, B., Chakraborty, R., Giusti, A.M., Eisenberg, A.J. & Allen, R.C. (1991). Anal- ysis of the VNTR locus DlS80 by the PCR followed by high...
Images
Published: 01 January 2018
Figure 2. PCR amplification of genes encoding for ɑ–CA and β–CA from P. profundum genomic DNA. (A) The presence of a 657 bp PCR product in lanes 1 to 4 indicates that ɑ–CA was successfully amplified. (B) The presence of a 675 bp PCR product in lanes 1 to 4 indicates that β–CA was
Images
Published: 01 November 2017
Figure 1. Image of an agarose gel showing the COI PCR products of six fish samples. (Each lane was loaded with 5μl of PCR product). The 100 bp DNA ladder in the first lane was used as a size standard reference. Figure 1. Image of an agarose gel showing the COI PCR products of six fish samples
Images
Published: 01 February 2016
Figure 11. Electrophoretic separation of simulated PCR-amplified Pitx1 regulatory DNA. Figure 11. Electrophoretic separation of simulated PCR-amplified Pitx1 regulatory DNA.
Images
Published: 01 September 2019
Figure 6. Results of multiplex PCRs indicating the presence of fungi in many soil samples (~600 bp). The pathogen was detected in some (~220 bp). ( A ) Coccidioides immitis was detected in sample JCo. ( B ) The pathogen was detected in samples JC, PS, EJ, Nora, and KD (PC = positive control
Images
Published: 01 February 2015
Figure 1. Results of PCR amplification of a variable region from two species of New World primates: owl monkey (om, Aotus trivirgatus ) and squirrel monkey (sm, Saimiri boliviensis ). Figure 1. Results of PCR amplification of a variable region from two species of New World primates: owl
Images
Published: 01 February 2015
Figure 3. Results of PCR amplification of the chorionic gonadotropin gene from human (h, Homo sapiens ), owl monkey (om, Aotus trivirgatus ), and squirrel monkey (sm, Saimiri boliviensis ). Figure 3. Results of PCR amplification of the chorionic gonadotropin gene from human (h, Homo sapiens
Images
Published: 01 March 2015
Figure 2. Image of experimental results. PCR products were amplified using gDNA from red (R) and white (W) onions, stained with ethidium bromide, and electrophoresed on a 1% agarose gel. M = marker lane, a 10-kb DNA marker for size comparison (Denville Scientific, http
Images
Published: 01 October 2012
Figure 3. Agarose gel electrophoresis (2%) showing successful PCR results (∼350 bp) obtained with a primer pair specific to Bd (water and sediment samples). Figure 3. Agarose gel electrophoresis (2%) showing successful PCR results (∼350 bp) obtained with a primer pair specific to Bd (water
Images
Published: 01 October 2012
Figure 2. Agarose gel electrophoresis (2%) showing successful PCR results obtained with primers to amplify a fragment of the 18S rRNA gene (∼250 bp) from micro-eukaryotes (water and sediment samples). Figure 2. Agarose gel electrophoresis (2%) showing successful PCR results obtained with
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2012; 744256–260 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2012.74.4.9
Published: 01 April 2012
...Angela R. Porta; Edward Enners The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a common technique used in high school and undergraduate science teaching. Students often do not fully comprehend the underlying principles of the technique and how optimization of the protocol affects the outcome and analysis...
Images
Published: 01 October 2012
Figure 4. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of PCR products obtained with micro-eukaryote-specific primers for all (A) water samples and (B) sediment samples. The strong bands visible in the water samples originated from different species in the family Cyclopidae. Figure 4. Denaturing
Images
Published: 01 April 2012
Figure 1. An example of an agarose gel showing typical student results from PCR reactions (samples 1–10); the first lane contains a low-molecular-weight DNA marker mix (“ladder”). Figure 1. An example of an agarose gel showing typical student results from PCR reactions (samples 1–10); the
Images
Published: 01 August 2011
Figure 1. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) ingredients and thermocycling times and temperatures. (A) The various PCR ingredients required for a PCR reaction are listed, with a visualization of a common 0.5-mL PCR reaction tube. (B) A picture of our thermocylcer (Techne Inc.) and a detailed list
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Published: 01 August 2011
Figure 5. Dirty PCR using fungal and bacterial colonies as template. 1.0% Ethidium bromide stained agarose gel resolving rDNA PCR products from mold or bacterial colonies. Lanes1–4 are individual and unique mold colonies picked for dirty PCR. Lanes 5–8 are unique individual bacterial colonies
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Published: 01 April 2012
Figure 2. Typical patterns of PCR product analysis by ethidium bromide staining of agarose gels produce one band of amplified cDNA for each set of (A) claudin-2 primers and (B) claudin-12 primers when using annealing temperature ranging from 51°C to 72°C. Figure 2. Typical patterns of PCR
Images
Published: 01 October 2010
Figure 5. Schematic of a gel, showing the PCR products amplified from controls and samples infected and uninfected with Wolbachia . The mitochondrial CO1 product runs at 658 base pairs (bp), whereas the Wolbachia product runs at 438 bp. The DNA ladder is used to size the PCR products. Sample