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meiosis

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Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2020; 825296–305 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2020.82.5.296
Published: 01 May 2020
...L. Kate Wright; Grace Elizabeth C. Dy; Dina L. Newman The process of meiosis is an essential topic that secondary and postsecondary students struggle with. The important meiosis-related concepts of homology, ploidy, and segregation can be described using the DNA Triangle framework, which connects...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2019; 81298–109 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2019.81.2.98
Published: 01 February 2019
...Kelsey J. Metzger; Joanna Yang Yowler The processes of mitosis and meiosis are oft-cited and long-standing examples of concepts that are difficult for students to learn and understand. While there are many examples in the literature of “how-to-do-it,” innovative instructional approaches for...
Includes: Supplementary data
Images
Images
Published: 01 August 2017
Figure 6. FACS plots for normal mitosis, normal meiosis, and abnormal meiosis. For each of the FACS plots, the heights of the peaks could vary. Each plot should contain a peak at relative fluorescence (RF) 1 and RF 2 for G 1 and G 2 , respectively. Normal gametes would have an RF of 0.5. Empty
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2017; 796482–491 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2017.79.6.482
Published: 01 August 2017
...Figure 2. Meiosis packet contents. Figure 2. Meiosis packet contents. ...
Images
Published: 01 May 2020
Figure 1. The DNA Triangle framework applied to meiosis. The concept of how proper Segregation is achieved links the Molecular and Chromosomal levels; the concept of Homology links the Informational and Molecular levels; and the concept of Ploidy links the Informational and Chromosomal levels
Images
Published: 01 December 2019
Figure 4. Students' modified models of meiosis. Most of the students, if not all, demonstrated a scientific understanding of meiosis. Figure 4. Students' modified models of meiosis. Most of the students, if not all, demonstrated a scientific understanding of meiosis.
Images
Published: 01 December 2019
Figure 3. The stages of meiosis. There is a single round of chromosome replication followed by two rounds of cell division. Note the chromosome behavior in each phase ( Biggs et al., 2004 ; used with permission of the publisher). Figure 3. The stages of meiosis. There is a single round of
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2014; 76153–56 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2014.76.1.11
Published: 01 January 2014
...Dorit Eliyahu I present an activity to help students make the connection between meiosis and genetic variation. The students model meiosis in the first phase of the activity, and by that process they produce gametes of a fictitious reptilobird species, “Chromoseratops meiosus.” Later on, they will...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2012; 744266–269 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2012.74.4.11
Published: 01 April 2012
...Peigao Luo The comprehension of chromosome movement during mitosis and meiosis is essential for understanding genetic transmission, but students often find this process difficult to grasp in a classroom setting. I propose a “double-spring model” that incorporates a physical demonstration and can be...
Images
Published: 01 August 2017
Figure 8. The content rubric used to evaluate each meiosis model. Figure 8. The content rubric used to evaluate each meiosis model.
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2019; 819610–617 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2019.81.9.610
Published: 01 December 2019
...Figure 4. Students' modified models of meiosis. Most of the students, if not all, demonstrated a scientific understanding of meiosis. Figure 4. Students' modified models of meiosis. Most of the students, if not all, demonstrated a scientific understanding of meiosis. ...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2006; 682106–109 doi: https://doi.org/10.2307/4451940
Published: 01 February 2006
...Joseph P. Chinnici; Somalin Zaroh Neth; Leah R. Sherman Copyright National Association of Biology Teachers References Clark, D.C. & Mathis, P.M. (2000). Modeling mitosis and meiosis: a problem-solving activity. The American Biology Teacher, 62(3), 204-206. Clark 3 204 62 The...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2005; 675310 doi: https://doi.org/10.2307/4451844
Published: 01 May 2005
...Jeff Sack Copyright National Association of Biology Teachers Mitosis and Meiosis Demystified SimBiotic Software for Teaching and Research, Inc. 0 0-R 0 z U H - JosE VAZQUEZ, DEPARTMENT EDITOR AV & Software Reviews MITOSIS & MEIOSIS Mitosis and Meiosis Demystified. (2004). CD-ROM...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2004; 66135–39 doi: https://doi.org/10.2307/4451614
Published: 01 January 2004
...Joseph P. Chinnici; Joyce W. Yue; Kieron M. Torres Copyright National Association of Biology Teachers References Clark, D.C. & Mathis, P.M. (2000). Modeling mitosis & meiosis: A problem-solv- ing activity. The American Biology Teacher62, 204- 206. Clark 204 62 The American...
Images
Published: 01 January 2014
Figure 2. Material for second activity: (A) Chromoseratops meiosis frame that is handed to students as part of Handout 2, and (B) the reptilobird frame with added phenotypes. Figure 2. Material for second activity: (A) Chromoseratops meiosis frame that is handed to students as part of
Images
Published: 01 January 2014
Figure 1. Modeling meiosis during the first activity. (A) Display of what students get as chromosomes of a germ cell: 2 sets of duplicated homologous chromosomes and 1 pair of sex chromosomes. (B) Cutting the chromosomes. (C) Tetrad formation during prophase I: homologous chromosomes arranged as
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2000; 623204–206 doi: https://doi.org/10.2307/4450874
Published: 01 March 2000
... to explore the process of meiosis. The American Biology Teacher, 57(8), 532-535. Levy 8 532 57 The American Biology Teacher 1995 Mathis, P.M. (1979). The use of manip- ulative models in teaching mitosis and meiosis. The American Biology Teacher, 41(9), 559-561. Mathis 9 559 41...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 1999; 614284–286 doi: https://doi.org/10.2307/4450672
Published: 01 April 1999
...Neil B. Schanker Copyright The National Association of Biology Teachers How-To-Do-It Meiosis, Genes & Popsicle Stick Neil B. Schanker What do aerobic respiration, protein synthesis, and meiosis have in com- mon? They are all subjects that stu- dents have trouble with in introduc- tory biology...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 1999; 61160–61 doi: https://doi.org/10.2307/4450612
Published: 01 January 1999
...Sara Krauskopf Copyright The National Association of Biology Teachers How-To-Do-It Doing the Meiosis Shuffle Sara Krauskopf What's the difference between Prophiase I and II? Why didn't I inherit the same genes as my sister? Isn't "replication" the same as a "homologouis pair"? Meiosis can be...