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hyphae

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Images
Published: 01 March 2012
Figure 1. Hyphae and chlamydospores of P. ramorum . Figure 1. Hyphae and chlamydospores of P. ramorum.
Images
Published: 01 May 2013
Figure 3. View of human hair and fungus hyphae as seen through the microscope (400×). The hair is the large brown band that covers most of the frame, ~80 µm in diameter. Fungus hyphae appear as curved dark lines across and around the hair, approximately 2–3 µm in diameter. Bar in lower right
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2013; 755336–339 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2013.75.5.7
Published: 01 May 2013
...Figure 3. View of human hair and fungus hyphae as seen through the microscope (400×). The hair is the large brown band that covers most of the frame, ~80 µm in diameter. Fungus hyphae appear as curved dark lines across and around the hair, approximately 2–3 µm in diameter. Bar in lower right...
Images
Published: 01 January 2018
Figure 2. Inoculation technique. Note the PDA plug used to inoculate the moss with the pathogen. Thin strands of pathogen hyphae can be seen coming off of the moss. Figure 2. Inoculation technique. Note the PDA plug used to inoculate the moss with the pathogen. Thin strands of pathogen hyphae
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2019; 819658–664 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2019.81.9.658
Published: 01 December 2019
... hundred species, is characterized by a complex life cycle that at first glance resembles that of filamentous fungi ( Hopwood, 2007 ). Spores germinate to form branched hyphae that constitute the vegetative mycelium, with the primary function of nutrient acquisition. Upon depletion of these nutrients...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2019; 815360–365 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2019.81.5.360
Published: 01 May 2019
... energy. Patterns There are specific food items and their components that tend to support or inhibit fungal growth. Constructing explanations Hypothesize whether fast-food components will support or inhibit fungal growth. Structure and Function Fungi are composed of filamentous hyphae that...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2018; 80135–39 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2018.80.1.35
Published: 01 January 2018
...Figure 2. Inoculation technique. Note the PDA plug used to inoculate the moss with the pathogen. Thin strands of pathogen hyphae can be seen coming off of the moss. Figure 2. Inoculation technique. Note the PDA plug used to inoculate the moss with the pathogen. Thin strands of pathogen hyphae...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2016; 785389–395 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2016.78.5.389
Published: 01 May 2016
... of terrestrial fungi that live on soil as saprobes , as parasites of insects and spiders, or as mutualists of other fungi and invertebrate animals. They produce no cells with flagella , and only one diploid cell – the zygospore – appears in the entire life cycle. Their hyphae are...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2014; 768536–541 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2014.76.8.7
Published: 01 October 2014
... and ecological processes. Gall: Abnormal growth or swelling by a plant in response to an insect or pathogen. Gallery: An insect hole, burrow, mine, or tunnel in wood or bark. Hyphae: The branching, filamentous portion of a fungus, usually seen as a white or dark, matted patch under bark...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2013; 759723–727 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2013.75.9.20
Published: 01 November 2013
...-I Hemophilia.......................9:652-A Heredity.......................3:178-RL HIV resistance.......................9:704-H Human Genome Project.......................7:480-H Hypha(e).......................5:336-H Hypothesis generation & testing...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2012; 743191–192 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2012.74.3.12
Published: 01 March 2012
...Figure 1. Hyphae and chlamydospores of P. ramorum . Figure 1. Hyphae and chlamydospores of P. ramorum. ...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2012; 745332–334 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2012.74.5.8
Published: 01 May 2012
... Microscopic organisms that are made up of filaments called hyphae and that reproduce by producing cells called spores that are distributed by air, water, or insects. Example: Penicillium spp. Mammals Multicellular organisms that ingest their food, have hair and mammary glands, and breathe air...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2011; 739528–536 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2011.73.9.5
Published: 01 November 2011
... Nutrient agar Pathogenic, Gram (+) cocci, clustered Staphylococcus epidermidis Nutrient agar Gram (+) cocci, clustered Streptococcus pyogenes Blood agar Pathogenic, Gram (+) cocci, chains, beta-hemolytic Streptomyces griseus Yeast malt extract agar Gram (+), form hyphae Vibrio...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2010; 728490–494 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2010.72.8.5
Published: 01 October 2010
... direction, to avoid recounting any leaf regions. Fungal colonization can be identified because fungal cells (hyphae) stain a deep blue. We have found that it is helpful to set up demonstration microscopes of stained leaves inoculated with fungi, to help the students distinguish between the stain and stained...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2009; 717424–429 doi: https://doi.org/10.2307/20565346
Published: 01 September 2009
... boreal forests. Mycorrhizae are trading partnerships between plant hosts and fungal symbionts. In these symbioses, carbohy drate from the plant is provided to the fungus in return for soil nutrients. The fine, thread-like hyphae of mycor rhizal fungi more thoroughly explore tiny pores in soil compared to...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2009; 714231–234 doi: https://doi.org/10.2307/27669416
Published: 01 April 2009
... from a trial run that we conducted. It is also possible that students will see fungal growth that can be typically differentiated from bacterial colonies by small hair like fibers (hyphae) growing from the dish. See Figure 3 for examples of colonies of bacterial and control plates. Figure 3. P?tri...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2007; 695287–291 doi: https://doi.org/10.2307/4452158
Published: 01 May 2007
... body but they do undergo both sexual and asexual reproduction (Figure 1). During sexual reproduction, hyphae of different mating types make contact and their cell walls break down. Following plasmogamy several nuclei pair and fuse to form a large heterokaryotic zygosporangium, the resistant stage that...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2005; 677401–410 doi: https://doi.org/10.2307/4451874
Published: 01 September 2005
... multicellular (molds and mushrooms) organisms. The multicellular molds are made up of filaments of cells called hyphae (singular: hypha). These filaments inter- twine and grow into a tangled, visible mass called a mycelium. This visible mycelium is what we call a mold. The hyphae can also be classified...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2004; 665377–382 doi: https://doi.org/10.2307/4451693
Published: 01 May 2004
... network of hyphae, or by an adhesive that keeps the nematodes from escaping. Strands of hyphae then invade the worm's body and release toxins that paralyze it. Many fungi that were considered saprophytes have turned out to be predators because, though wood and other plant materials supply carbohydrates...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2003; 656409–417 doi: https://doi.org/10.2307/4451528
Published: 01 August 2003
... black bread mold that has specialized spore-producing hyphae (asexual) and conjugating filaments (sexual); Coprinus, a gill mushroom with diagnostic "club" spore- producing structures (sexual); and yeast, an atypical sac fungus with observable spores and buds. As with the protists, students delineate...