1-20 of 1233 Search Results for

genetic-code

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2003; 654245 doi: https://doi.org/10.2307/4451488
Published: 01 April 2003
...Simon Black Copyright National Association of Biology Teachers Reference Black, S. (2001). The American Biology Teacher, 63, 547. Black 547 63 The American Biology Teacher 2001 THE HIDDEN HISTORY OF THE GENETIC CODE N 0? mechanism in the living cell is more intricate than...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 1996; 586326 doi: https://doi.org/10.2307/4450167
Published: 01 September 1996
...Linda Blumenthal Copyright 1996 The National Association of Biology Teachers Lters[ Genetic Code Clarification Appreciated Dear Editor: I have just read the guest editorial by Ricki Lewis in the February issue about the use and misuse of the term genetic code. Thank you for publishing it; this...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 1992; 543187–190 doi: https://doi.org/10.2307/4449446
Published: 01 March 1992
... Teacher, 46, 411-414. Spain 411 46 The American Biology Teacher 1984 Stryer, L. (1989). The molecular design of life. New York: W.H. Freeman. Stryer The molecular design of life 1989 DIK ll Computer Center Decipherng the Genetic Code A Process-oriented Computer Simulation Mark...
Images
Explanation for why the <b>genetic</b> <b>code</b> requires sequences of three nucleotide...
Published: 01 March 2019
Figure 2. Explanation for why the genetic code requires sequences of three nucleotides to create unique codons for all 20 amino acids. Figure 2. Explanation for why the genetic code requires sequences of three nucleotides to create unique codons for all 20 amino acids. Figure 2. Explanation for why the genetic code requires sequences of three nucleotides to create unique codons for all 20 amino acids. Figure 2. Explanation for why the genetic code requires sequences of three nucleotides to create unique codons for all 20 amino acids. More
Images
Universal <b>genetic</b> <b>code</b>. A color version of this figure can be viewed online...
Published: 01 April 2017
Figure 9. Universal genetic code. A color version of this figure can be viewed online. Figure 9. Universal genetic code. A color version of this figure can be viewed online. Figure 9. Universal genetic code. A color version of this figure can be viewed online. Figure 9. Universal genetic code. A color version of this figure can be viewed online. More
Images
A copy of the Dictionary of the <b>Genetic</b> <b>Code</b>, which students use to transla...
Published: 01 April 2012
Figure 2. A copy of the Dictionary of the Genetic Code, which students use to translate a codon sequence into its corresponding amino acid. Figure 2. A copy of the Dictionary of the Genetic Code, which students use to translate a codon sequence into its corresponding amino acid. Figure 2. A copy of the Dictionary of the Genetic Code, which students use to translate a codon sequence into its corresponding amino acid. Figure 2. A copy of the Dictionary of the Genetic Code, which students use to translate a codon sequence into its corresponding amino acid. More
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2019; 813202–209 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2019.81.3.202
Published: 01 March 2019
...Figure 2. Explanation for why the genetic code requires sequences of three nucleotides to create unique codons for all 20 amino acids. Figure 2. Explanation for why the genetic code requires sequences of three nucleotides to create unique codons for all 20 amino acids. ...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2017; 799763–768 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2017.79.9.763
Published: 01 November 2017
... as DNA isolation, agarose gel electrophoresis, polymerase chain reaction, DNA sequencing mechanisms, and DNA database analysis. In addition, students will observe how the evolutionary relatedness of species is reflected in the genetic code, and consider how the ecology of fish species influences...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2011; 737418 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2011.73.7.9
Published: 01 September 2011
...Evan Lampert I explain a classroom activity to model translation of RNA into proteins. Students are given worksheets with short mRNA sequences and a genetic code coding phrases instead of amino acids. Students use the code to write a sentence from their mRNA sequences; a "Chuck Norris fact" is...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2017; 794257–271 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2017.79.4.257
Published: 01 April 2017
... teachers may use and adapt the method to their own instructional contexts. The T3 Method brings structural sense to sequence by leveraging simple protein folding codes to link genetic information with the protein structure-function it prescribes. T3 extends and conceptually completes traditional two...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2020; 825315–322 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2020.82.5.315
Published: 01 May 2020
... unmasking of the genetic code, biologists have fancied the thought of artificially manipulating DNA sequences to suit their own purposes. Biologists dreamed of treating genetic diseases, improving agricultural products, and pushing the boundaries of genetic research. With the discovery of restriction...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2020; 825279–288 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2020.82.5.279
Published: 01 May 2020
... prohibition of many CRISPR technologies and applications. But the temptation to control nature is ever present and provides an ongoing tension between that which we can do and that which we should do. This temptation was recognized soon after the genetic code was deciphered in the 1960s. According to...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2020; 825296–305 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2020.82.5.296
Published: 01 May 2020
... without sister chromatids), identification of chromosomes by banding pattern and centromere location, representations of chromatin packing, and counting chromosomes. The I level describes how DNA encodes genetic information, such as genes or alleles, protein-coding regions, or regulatory information...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2020; 825333–337 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2020.82.5.333
Published: 01 May 2020
... organisms, and that new evidence continues to improve our understanding of the tree of life. Table 1. Alignment of student activities with Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS). NGSS Dimension NGSS Topics & Codes Student Activities Science and Engineering Practices...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2020; 824270–271 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2020.82.4.270b
Published: 01 April 2020
... revealing what is coded in a person's genome. Males possess an X and a Y chromosome, while females have two X chromosomes. Errors in science experiments are solved by replicating the experiments. There are absolute laws of biology responsible for the way living organisms grow, develop, and survive...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2020; 82158–59 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2020.82.1.58b
Published: 01 January 2020
... genetic code and the realization that its replication, transcription, and translation were the same for all organisms. With the appearance of gene technology, the gene concept became that of an entity that was interchangeable and could be manipulated. New discoveries – with new names such as...
Images
Chain identifiers ( A ) are used to help students find the general location...
Published: 01 March 2019
for determining which color and size of paper is to be used for making the paper chains. These are the exact same decoders as used to decode the genetic code. The only difference is that A, C, G, and U are substituted for the four shapes, and each amino acid has been substituted with a paper chain for determining which color and size of paper is to be used for making the paper chains. These are the exact same decoders as used to decode the genetic code. The only difference is that A, C, G, and U are substituted for the four shapes, and each amino acid has been substituted with a paper chain More
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2020; 82293–101 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2020.82.2.93
Published: 01 February 2020
... to explore how students' conceptions of evolution changed in response to The Language of God . Qualitative data were analyzed using constant comparative methods to identify themes in student responses ( Glaser & Strauss, 1967 ). A subset of data was initially coded together by three researchers...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2019; 819680–685 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2019.81.9.680
Published: 01 December 2019
...............................1.27-I, 4.287-TT, 5.360-I Gametes............................5.366-I Gel electrophorsis............................3.162-I Gene editing............................1.1-E Gene transfer............................8.577-I GenePool............................1.12-F Genetic code...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher. 2019; 819665–667 doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2019.81.9.665
Published: 01 December 2019
... et al., 2012 ) is to show graphs of allelic frequencies over generational time from computer simulations that were coded to model random processes in populations of different sizes. There may also be some discussion of modeling random processes via the analogy of the “drunkard's walk” ( Futuyma, 2005...