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facultative-anaerobes

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Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (2018) 80 (3): 198–202.
Published: 01 March 2018
... technique to culture facultative anaerobic bacteria from yogurt in high school or undergraduate biology laboratories. Using the method discussed, which uses readily available and low-cost equipment, students can culture and visually identify facultative anaerobic bacteria that they may consume on a regular...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (2018) 80 (9): 697–701.
Published: 01 November 2018
...............................8.631-D, 9.686-TT Facultative anaerobes............................3.198-I Fake news............................8.631-D, 9.686-TT Feedback............................4.301-TT Field methods............................5.359-I First-year success............................3.184-RL Food...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (2016) 78 (3): 258–260.
Published: 01 March 2016
... microbes have the potential to cause disease, especially when in high numbers. The majority of what students will recover in this experiment are Streptococcus species, which may be biosafety level 1 or 2. These are facultative anaerobes, and growing them in the agar rather than on top slightly reduces...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (2012) 74 (8): 571–573.
Published: 01 October 2012
... information or a particular understanding to be uncovered by the student. As a case in point, a question that presents a scenario about the rate of glucose consumption and ATP production by yeast cells in an environment with unpredictable oxygen levels is almost certainly targeting knowledge about facultative...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (2011) 73 (3): 180–183.
Published: 01 March 2011
... of bacterial ecosystems after transplantation are questioning this approach. They've found that the earliest settlers in the intestines are enterobacteriaceae, which are facultative anaerobes, which means that they can grow with or without oxygen. These organisms can indicate the presence of...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (2008) 70 (5): 299–302.
Published: 01 May 2008
...: Gram-positive bacteria (Firmicutes and Actinobacteria), the Bacteroidetes, and the Proteobacteria. These three are found in adults as well, though there are few Proteobacteria which are facultative anaerobes; their ability to grow with or without oxygen may give them an edge as early colonists. By the...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (2007) 69 (5): 298–303.
Published: 01 May 2007
... singly, in pairs, or in short chains. The enterococci are facultative anaerobes with an optimum growth temperature of 370 C but most will grow between 10 and 450 C (Holt et al.,1994). They are ubiquitous, occurring in soil and water. They have been well characterized as commensal inhabitants of the guts...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (2003) 65 (8): 595–598.
Published: 01 October 2003
... - another adaptation that's great, Are tiny coccoid cells that take them at high rates, High surface:volume ratios, and very little sinking, That's what Synechoccus and Synechocystis were thinking.5 The phototrophic facultative anaerobe blue- greens Are able to grow and metabolize by different means.4 To...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (2003) 65 (8): 615–618.
Published: 01 October 2003
... demonstrated that an energy cell fueled by the metabo- lism of E. coli can be constructed from materials commonly found in biological laboratories. This sys- tem can be used to examine a wide variety of biological concepts. Facultative anaerobic bacteria such as E. coli represent an effec- tive model for...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (2001) 63 (3): 199–206.
Published: 01 March 2001
...- lected, because denitrification is per- formed by facultative anaerobes that are present in oxic soils. The amount of time for a soil slurry to become hypoxic after adding Oxyrase? varies, but most soils became hypoxic between 12 to 24 hours, and remained hypoxic for at least 50 hours. Aliquot the...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (1999) 61 (8): 580–586.
Published: 01 October 1999
... and cocci 5 Facultatively-anaerobic Gram-negative rods 17 Gram-positive cocci 18 Endospore-forming Gram-positive rods and cocci 19 Regular, nonsporing Gram-positive rods 20 Irregular, nonsporing Gram-positive rods 22 Actinomycetes After the group has been identified, biochemical and physi- ological...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (1999) 61 (6): 453–459.
Published: 01 June 1999
... otherwise gray soil matrix suggest soils with spots of iron and manganese oxides in an otherwise reduced environment. The development of gleys and mottles is mediated by microbiological pro- cesses and the rate at which they are formed depends on the presence of sustained anaerobic conditions, appro- priate...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (1994) 56 (5): 294–296.
Published: 01 May 1994
... nonpathogenic microbes that are easy to maintain. The bacteria most often isolated are aerobic or facultatively anaerobic chemoheterotrophs of the generic groups Arthrobacter, Bacillus and Pseudomonas. These bacteria are relatively simple to identify, at least to the level of the generic group. Al- though a...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (1993) 55 (5): 288–291.
Published: 01 May 1993
... (Youmans, Patterson & Sommers 1985). Simple culturing experiments that study microbial relationships can be constructed to simulate the de- velopment of anaerobic infections from initially mixed cultures consisting of aerobes or facultatives and anaerobes as well as synergistic interactions among bacteria...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (1980) 42 (9): 4447105.
Published: 01 December 1980
... generous information for the teacher on media, suggested experiments with the expected results. Ideas for running a good course with fewer types of media. Mostly bacteria, some yeasts and molds, some genetics, aerobes, microaerophiles, facultative anaerobes, anaerobes, halo- philes, thermophiles...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (1974) 36 (5): 316.
Published: 01 May 1974
... potentially confus- ing to students. More regrettably, the statement (p. 58) that "The term fermentation should never be used in reference to any microbial process, un- less the process is performed under anaerobic conditions," is quite mis- leading. Have the obligately fermenta- tive but facultatively...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (1974) 36 (5): 316.
Published: 01 May 1974
...- ing to students. More regrettably, the statement (p. 58) that "The term fermentation should never be used in reference to any microbial process, un- less the process is performed under anaerobic conditions," is quite mis- leading. Have the obligately fermenta- tive but facultatively anaerobic lactic...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (1974) 36 (5): 315–316.
Published: 01 May 1974
... potentially confus- ing to students. More regrettably, the statement (p. 58) that "The term fermentation should never be used in reference to any microbial process, un- less the process is performed under anaerobic conditions," is quite mis- leading. Have the obligately fermenta- tive but facultatively...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (1974) 36 (5): 316–317.
Published: 01 May 1974
... potentially confus- ing to students. More regrettably, the statement (p. 58) that "The term fermentation should never be used in reference to any microbial process, un- less the process is performed under anaerobic conditions," is quite mis- leading. Have the obligately fermenta- tive but facultatively...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (1983) 45 (3): 128–138.
Published: 01 March 1983
.... Since phosphorous and potassium compounds formed during digestion are not volatile, there is no loss of these minerals. The production of biogas occurs in three stages. In the first (fig. 5), carried out by facultative and anaerobic bacteria, complex organic compounds such as cellulose, starch, and...