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energy-drink

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Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (2019) 81 (6): 430–434.
Published: 01 August 2019
... for middle school students participating in an after-school program to assist them with designing their own experiment using planarians (flatworms) exposed to caffeine, sugar, and an energy drink. Results indicated that the average velocity of the planarians in 1 mM caffeine, 1 mM sucrose, and 0.1...
Includes: Supplementary data
Images
Effects of Monster <b>Energy</b> <b>drink</b> on planarians&#x27; motility.   Figure 2. Effect...
Published: 01 August 2019
Figure 2. Effects of Monster Energy drink on planarians' motility. Figure 2. Effects of Monster Energy drink on planarians' motility. More
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (2017) 79 (1): 35–40.
Published: 01 January 2017
...Maria Greene; Wesley Pitts; Brahmadeo Dewprashad Daphnia have been used to demonstrate the physiological effects of stimulants such as caffeine and energy drinks in activities designed for secondary school and college labs. We describe how these activities were enhanced by coupling a microscope to...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (2019) 81 (9): 680–685.
Published: 01 December 2019
...............................7.474-F Elementary students............................9.626-OL, 9.626-RL Emerging infection............................1.32-I Energy drinks............................6.430-I Energy (plant cycle)............................3.145-E, 9.645-I Engineering design process...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (2018) 80 (5): 385–389.
Published: 01 May 2018
... representing methylmercury pollution. The students are asked what might happen when their organisms live in and drink from a polluted water source. Once a student correctly identifies that the organisms should have pollution in them as well, each student is given one penny to place in their cup, representing...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (2017) 79 (8): 661–667.
Published: 01 October 2017
... experimental supplies and travel expenses for the visit to Butler University. Instructor Notes : Numerous groups were interested in assessing C. elegans behavior in response to chemical stimuli: sugar water, caffeine, energy drinks, etc. Though an interesting concept, it proved challenging to assess...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (2016) 78 (9): 764–771.
Published: 01 November 2016
... one-day lab, consider using substances that have known effects to avoid a frustrating or disappointing experience among students. Also, if examining the effects of novel treatments (e.g., energy drinks, hot sauce, perfumes or colognes, etc.), we suggest initially varying concentration levels in decade...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (2016) 78 (9): 739–745.
Published: 01 November 2016
... by a tour of a municipal drinking water treatment facility. This provides an important opportunity for reflection as students compare treatment of wastewater and drinking water. It also provides another example of how science and technology impact their lives. The wastewater treatment activities can...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (2016) 78 (7): 591–598.
Published: 01 September 2016
... that drive a red worm's response to chemical exposure. To enhance interest in and ownership of the module, students are free to test a chemical that is of interest to them. In past years, choices have included a wide range of chemicals, such as sugar water, caffeine, nicotine, energy drinks, and...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (2016) 78 (8): 657–661.
Published: 01 October 2016
... elderberry-flower cakes. Several students recognized the common plant and referred to a brand of lemonade or a mixed drink that contains elderberry syrup. The nature of this activity was such that no statistically evaluable test could be given; nor was a scent-based exam possible, because the plants...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (2016) 78 (6): 509–511.
Published: 01 August 2016
... the Irish potato famine and reflect upon the role this plant disease has played in human migrations and politics. We have devised a game to simulate the role of bacteria that block transpiration by having two children race to drink the liquid in their cup through a straw. One student emulates a...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (2016) 78 (5): 417–423.
Published: 01 May 2016
... the bathroom floor after a New Year's Eve party, which she had left early because she was light-headed. The son says she had a few drinks at the party, but nothing to worry him. However, the husband of the patient says she had quite a few drinks and that he believes she just had too many. At a later...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (2016) 78 (1): 62–66.
Published: 01 January 2016
... al., 2014 ). The scale is labeled, and participants are first instructed to think about a food or drink that has no sensation (labeled “0”) and a food or drink that has the strongest imaginable sensation (labeled “100”). Then any food or drink can be presented to them, and they are instructed to...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (2015) 77 (9): 724–728.
Published: 01 November 2015
... Microscopy Using Simulated Paleobiogeography .............................. 5:363-I “STOP: Can You Drink That Water?” Microbiology, Chemistry, & Advocacy in an Inquiry-Based Water Quality Curriculum for 8th Graders ..................... 5:369-I Growing a Thicker Skin: An Exercise for Measuring...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (2015) 77 (5): 369–375.
Published: 01 May 2015
..., effectiveness, and availability of water treatment techniques, in particular those used to treat their drinking water. Students test and critique the pros and cons of using different sample dilutions to quantify microbes in water, different selective media to identify the microbes present, and...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (2014) 76 (9): 595–600.
Published: 01 November 2014
... section of the laboratory report. Mean time (seconds ± SD) sugar-fed and protein-fed 4-day-old flies spent on each treatment (M. Rush, University of Florida). Figure 1. Petri dish used during both experiments, with the rolled-up gauze and carbohydrate substrate (sports drink) placed...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (2013) 75 (5): 358–359.
Published: 01 May 2013
...). Senate press release. Available online at http://www.blumenthal.senate.gov/newsroom/press/release/blumenthal-durbin-fda-taking-energy-drink-concerns-seriously . Cunningham, S.L., Buckland, H.T. & Martin-Morris, L. (2012). What is the link between eating, reproducing, & addiction? American...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (2014) 76 (2): 88–92.
Published: 01 February 2014
.... Because energy is used to generate and maintain order, there is no conflict with the second law of thermodynamics. ( Sadava et al., 2011 ) An organism’s astonishing gift of concentrating a “stream of order” on itself and thus escaping the decay into atomic chaos – of “drinking orderliness” from a...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (2013) 75 (6): 413–415.
Published: 01 August 2013
... achieve this excess weight. That’s the Calorie amount in only 4 ounces of soda. As should be clear, it’s all about the Calorie. One can understand student misconceptions about energy by examining cans of popular drinks, like Monster Energy Lo-Carb, which has only 20 Calories in the 16-ounce can and 160 mg...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (2013) 75 (8): 595–596.
Published: 01 October 2013
... gradual disappearance of the forest has been accom- panied by reduced rainfall. Drinking-water sources are the same as those used for laundry, bathing, and animal use. This leads to dangerous pollution and disease trans- mission. There is much concern about the rapidly growing Kenyan population and that...