1-20 of 50 Search Results for

buoyancy

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (2017) 79 (1): 49–54.
Published: 01 January 2017
... public. In this three-part activity, students are introduced to the concepts of buoyancy and overfishing in an effort to provide a glimpse of how interesting fish are, and to raise awareness of overfishing. The students investigate buoyancy and gas compressibility by recreating a mysterious boat-sinking...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (1975) 37 (1): 49.
Published: 01 January 1975
...Ralph Postiglione Copyright 1975 National Association of Biology Teachers DANCING MOTHBALLS AND FISH BUOYANCY Nature has invented a marvelous ballast organ, the swim bladder or air bladder, that enables fish to rise, float, or sink in water. Sometimes connected to the pharynx, it absorbs gases...
Images
Schematic of the bottles used in day 3, fish <b>buoyancy</b> lab.   Figure 7. Sche...
Published: 01 January 2017
Figure 7. Schematic of the bottles used in day 3, fish buoyancy lab. Figure 7. Schematic of the bottles used in day 3, fish buoyancy lab. More
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (2017) 79 (9): 787–791.
Published: 01 November 2017
...: Territoriality in Cichlids............................1:41-I Floating Fishes: An Activity Investigating Overfishing, Buoyancy & Gas Compressibility............................1:49-I Modeling Evolution in the Classroom: An Interactive LEGO Simulation............................2:130-I Sexual...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (2017) 79 (1): 64–67.
Published: 01 January 2017
... metabolic activity. Continuous submerged swimming or floating may be eased by a reduced buoyancy, given that its “lungs are one-third those of equally sized ranids” ( McNab, 2002 ), though a claim that it is lungless, as put forward by Bartlett and Bartlett (1996) , has no basis. Perhaps its lungs function...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (2016) 78 (1): 7–13.
Published: 01 January 2016
... organism. Easy methods of DNA extraction and transformation and genetic, genomic, and bioinformatic analysis have been developed for it. NRC-1 has a rich history, as an agent of spoilage of salted food, in early studies of cell buoyancy and motility, and in the identification of the novel, yet ubiquitous...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (2016) 78 (1): 35–42.
Published: 01 January 2016
... features of plankton, have students construct models of plankton to test the effect of structure on plankton sinking rates ( Smith et al., 2007 ). By generating hypotheses about the traits that affect buoyancy, creating a series of models of different shapes, and then timing their sinking rates through a...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (2015) 77 (2): 99–106.
Published: 01 February 2015
... defensive ink production algal pigment storage Prince & Johnson, 2006 Octopus vulgaris (common octopus) shell external protection N Napoleão et al., 2005 Teuthida (squid) phragmocone buoyancy muscle and fin attachment Arkhipkin et al., 2012 Arthropoda Cirripedia...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (2013) 75 (1): 65–66.
Published: 01 January 2013
..., ornamentation, body chamber, phragmocone, septa, the siphuncle and buoyancy regulation, apparatus, radula and diet, arms and tentacles, eyes, development, mode of life, reproduction, dimorphism, stability, swimming, pathology and teratology, taphonomy, biostratigraphy, mass extinctions, and more. The second...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (2012) 74 (6): 367.
Published: 01 August 2012
...) Ammonoids have an exceptionally good fossil record. What characteristics do they possess that makes them a good candidate for preservation in the fossil record? (2) One of the chambers of the ammonoid was used as a living space and the rest were used to regulate buoyancy, just like in a submarine. Can...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (2013) 75 (1): 72–74.
Published: 01 January 2013
... lightweight feathers are integral to flight now does not mean that they originated for this function. They insulated dinosaurs, long before the prospect of flying. Likewise, lungs made the vertebrate transition to land possible. But first, as swim bladders, they helped regulate buoyancy in organisms that were...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (2005) 67 (6): 343–347.
Published: 01 August 2005
..., the greater buoyancy and reduced drag forces due to higher relative fat would be advantageous in swimming (Drinkwater & Mazza, 1994). Male and female race times can be conveniently contrasted using the performance comparison (PC) in which the average female speed in an event is expressed as a...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (2004) 66 (5): 384–385.
Published: 01 May 2004
... spectacular eating mechanism. Footage of the Chambered Nautilus is shown, exhibiting how they come to surface at night to feed. There is also a dis- cussion of their incredible buoyancy controls. The anatomy and physiology of the mantle and the mollusk shell is described. JosE VAZQUEZ is a Professor of...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (2003) 65 (8): 595–598.
Published: 01 October 2003
... quit, For many, many years they will patiently sit.3'5 Gas vacuoles have an important ecological func- tion, To sensitive pigments a means of light reduction, A method of buoyancy regulation or movement, An adaptive feature that's quite an improvement.' A place in the water column is maintained, Over...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (2001) 63 (4): 267–270.
Published: 01 April 2001
... teeth? In essence, why do things look or act the way they do? You might feel an immediate urge to explain these observations-to yourself or to your students-by recalling surface to volume constraints limiting diffusion, buoyancy and ther- moregulation, or (if you really remem- ber your physics) by...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (1995) 57 (5): 288–292.
Published: 01 May 1995
... for introductory college students. One uses Elodea sprigs, measuring oxygen released as an index of PS response; the other uses infiltrated leaf disks where buoyancy is an indication of PS. Several excellent papers deal with this method (Steucek & Hill 1985a; Juliao & Butcher 1989; Tatina 1986...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (1990) 52 (2): 117.
Published: 01 February 1990
... capitalize on these segments and not leave the students frustrated. "Fooling Around with Science" spotlights kids experimenting with air pressure and buoyancy. The episode demonstrating the relationship be- tween mass and weight displacement of various objects in water has the ca- pability to motivate grades...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (1991) 53 (3): 181–184.
Published: 01 March 1991
... on land. Others claim that the neck was too stiff and weak for such activity and see a more aquatic lifestyle; in water the weight of the neck would have been relieved by buoyancy. Taylor takes the view that the neck might have had no adaptive advan- tage at all. Its length might be an indirect...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (1987) 49 (7): 442–445.
Published: 01 October 1987
... adaptation to whale predation (Taylor 1986). Squid elude the whale's echoloca- tion system because they do not re- flect sound well. Early cephalopods had air-filled buoyancy chambers that reflect sound strongly, but in squid these have been replaced by a hydro- dynamic lift system. But again, this cannot be...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (1986) 48 (1): 54–56.
Published: 01 January 1986
... Thompson, D. (1943). On growth and form (2nd ed.). New York: Macmillan. Thompson 2 On growth and form 1943 Ward, P., Greenwald, L., & Greenwald, 0. (1980). The buoyancy of the chambered nautilus. Scientific American, 243 (4), 190- 203. Ward 4 190 243 Scientific American 1980...