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art-and-science-fusion

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Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (2016) 78 (1): 24–33.
Published: 01 January 2016
... breakup and fusion of landmasses – will allow us to make more accurate associations between species divergence and specific geological events, with important implications for the understanding of biogeography and the evolution of species within these groups. For questions 4 and 5 of the WebQuest...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (2015) 77 (5): 392–393.
Published: 01 May 2015
... insects as examples of nature’s music and their influence on human music, Bug Music is a fascinating fusion of the arts and the sciences. The author considers insect music to be true music because “it communicates not as simple information, but as rhythmic flow and performance in a regular...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (2012) 74 (7): 441–443.
Published: 01 September 2012
... “more a bush with multiple stems and a diffuse rootstock than a tree with a single, well-defined trunk and roots.” This botanical metaphor fits the model of the seminal philosopher of science, Thomas Kuhn (1970) , who proposed that a developing scientific discipline may represent a fusion of several...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (2012) 74 (2): 74–80.
Published: 01 February 2012
... selection: perhaps males and females preferred mates that were more skilled. Geoffrey Miller (2000) proposed that such sexual selection may be responsible for such traits as language, music, and the arts. Anagenesis bonobo brain chimpanzee cladogenesis evolution human evolution References...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (2010) 72 (3): 146–147.
Published: 01 March 2010
... learning hands-on learning kinesthetic learning interdisciplinary learning art and science fusion Here are a few final suggestions. If you have fewer than 11 colors of clay, students can either double up on nonadjacent organs (e.g., make both the heart and the pancreas blue) or they can mix the...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (2007) 69 (2): 109–112.
Published: 01 February 2007
.... in biology from Marymount Manhattan College; an M.S., also in biology, from Boston College; and a Ph.D. in sci- ence education from New York University. Her major interests are in communicating science to the nonscientist and in the relationship between biology and art. BIOLOGY TODAY 109 It was also...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (2005) 67 (7): 401–410.
Published: 01 September 2005
... from cubical to spherical to vase-shaped. The sexual spores form from the fusion of two parental nuclei followed by meiosis. There are three types of sexual spores: zygospores, ascospores, and basidiospores. The sexual spores are produced less fre- quently than the predominant asexual spores, however...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (2005) 67 (2): 113–117.
Published: 01 February 2005
.... Her major interests are in communicating science to the nonscientist and in the rela- tionship between biology and art. U >0 0- 0-4 oN)Iw" r BIOLOGY TODAY 113 imbued with Darwin's attitude that we're still startled to find evolutionary change appearing before our eyes. Perhaps part of the reason is...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (2003) 65 (3): 170–239.
Published: 01 March 2003
... musical instrument. No knowledge of music or physics of sound is necessary. Co-sponsored by the Massachusetts Space Grant Consortium. Contact: david.lapp(itufts.edu Space Science XIX: Space Art and Science. 25 - 29 June, Tufts University Astronomical artwork has fired our imagination and helped maintain...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (2003) 65 (2): 142–147.
Published: 01 February 2003
... ests are in communicating science to the nonscientist and i the relationship between biology and art. U- 0 H 0 0 0 - wg |4 ' j , 142 THE AMERICAN BIOLOGY TEACHER, VOLUME 65, NO.2, FEBRUARY 2003 a good reminder of the joys of digging a little deeper into a topic. Most of us teach survey courses where...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (2001) 63 (9): 631–632.
Published: 01 November 2001
... poetic passion. However, it is somewhat unusual that a per- son whose innate interests were equally divided between science and the arts would earn a Ph.D. in science. After all, when my hardcore pre-med friends were taking biolo- gy and chemistry courses as elec- tives, I was taking Shakespearean...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (2001) 63 (7): 498–502.
Published: 01 September 2001
... of two general mechanisms-facilitated dif- fusion and active transport. In facilitated diffu- sion, ions traverse the plasma membrane by travelling down free energy gradients within special molecules that shield them from the hydrophobic fatty acid chains of phospholipid molecules making up the...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (2000) 62 (2): 145–149.
Published: 01 February 2000
... chapter on "The Creative Mind" in which he explains why the "act of fusion," of finding similarities between two seem- ingly dissimilar things or processes, is the essence of both poetry and science. Illumination comes from this compari- son. Just as the great poets are those who can create the most...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (1999) 61 (5): 389.
Published: 01 May 1999
... the importance of symmetry in mate selection, for example, includes discussions of the theories behind the research, interviews with the leading scientists involved, descriptions of their experiments, and references to the importance of symmetry in human art and culture. This article, like others in...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (1999) 61 (5): 385–386.
Published: 01 May 1999
... is annoying is that when a specific section is zoomed in for closer inspection, the rest of the page is lost from view. Along with the thrill of looking at and appreciating the visual art from this book, I yearned to feel the texture of the folio and feel the turn of the page. Perhaps the publishers...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (1999) 61 (5): 389–390.
Published: 01 May 1999
... importance of symmetry in mate selection, for example, includes discussions of the theories behind the research, interviews with the leading scientists involved, descriptions of their experiments, and references to the importance of symmetry in human art and culture. This article, like others in the book...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (1999) 61 (5): 388–389.
Published: 01 May 1999
... theories behind the research, interviews with the leading scientists involved, descriptions of their experiments, and references to the importance of symmetry in human art and culture. This article, like others in the book, also touches on contro- versy surrounding the issue at hand and presents the views...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (1999) 61 (3): 192–200.
Published: 01 March 1999
... Report 6 GARY TAUBES 111 The Wager From Bad Science: The Short Life and Weird Times of Cold Fusion 7 JOHN SEABROOK 130 E-Mail from Bill The New Yorker 8 DEBORAH BLUM 168 The Monkey Wars Sacramento Bee 9 JAMEs GLEICK 181 In Search of Genius From Genius: The Life and Science of Richard Feynman 10 ELSSA ELY...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (1996) 58 (5): 316–320.
Published: 01 May 1996
...-the-art research facility located on the campus of the Carolinas Medical Cen- ter. The James Cannon Research Centerpro- vides research for basic science and active clinical medicine. You will visit Orthopedics, Pediatrics, Emergency Medicine, General Sur- gery, and Cardiovascular Research laborato...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (1993) 55 (3): 191–192.
Published: 01 March 1993
...- eral arts students. The book is well illustrated and contains numerous aids for the reader. Focus on Human Biology would be most suitable for use in a human biol- ogy course or an introductory biology course which emphasizes the human body, although it might also be con- sidered for a very basic human...