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Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (2018) 80 (9): 669–674.
Published: 01 November 2018
...Heesoo Ha; Heui-Baik Kim As an attempt to contribute to implementing scientific argumentation in classrooms, this study aimed to design an argumentation activity in which students were supported in engaging in the epistemic practices of scientific community. We reinterpreted prediction-observation...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (2009) 71 (8): 465–472.
Published: 01 October 2009
...: National Institutes of Health, Office of Science Education. Driver, R., Newton, P.& Osborne,J. (2000). Establishing the norms of scientific argumentation in class- rooms. Science Education, 84(3), 287-313. Duschl, R. A. & Osborne, J. (2002). Supporting and promoting argumentation...
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (2018) 80 (2): 100–104.
Published: 01 February 2018
...David Westmoreland The missing link argument is a common challenge raised by students to evolutionary theory; it notes that the majority of evolutionary transitions are not represented in the fossil record. A typical response is to present examples of fossils that have a combination of ancestral...
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Engaging in <b>argument</b> from evidence.   Figure 7. Engaging in <b>argument</b> from e...
Published: 01 October 2012
Figure 7. Engaging in argument from evidence. Figure 7. Engaging in argument from evidence. More
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (2003) 65 (7): 512–516.
Published: 01 September 2003
...). The Demon-Haunted World: Science as a Candle in the Dark. New York: Ballentine. Sagan The Demon-Haunted World: Science as a Candle in the Dark 1996 Evolution and Creationism: One Lon Argument RON GOOD A \ Brief History Ever since Darwin published On the Origin of Species in 1859...
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The missing link <b>argument</b> is inconsistent with scientific thinking because ...
Published: 01 February 2018
Figure 1. The missing link argument is inconsistent with scientific thinking because it is nonfalsifiable. If fossil B is discovered with transitional traits between A and D, two new missing links result (A → B and B → D). If fossil C is discovered to fill the transition between B and D, it again More
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Why the missing link <b>argument</b> usually cannot be answered by the presentatio...
Published: 01 February 2018
Figure 2. Why the missing link argument usually cannot be answered by the presentation of transitional species. The argument expects scientists to identify the species that occupies the direct lineage between an older and a younger species. The scientist can present transitional forms (in this More
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (2016) 78 (7): 549–559.
Published: 01 September 2016
...Ying-Chih Chen; Mathew J. Benus; Morgan B. Yarker Scientists use models to represent their imagination and conceptualization of a particular phenomenon. They then use models to develop an argument to debate, defend, and debunk ideas in their peer community. Modeling is an essential practice of...
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Students’ first written <b>argument</b>.   Figure 5. Students’ first written argum...
Published: 01 September 2016
Figure 5. Students’ first written argument. Figure 5. Students’ first written argument. More
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Framework for science <b>argument</b> and model in science classrooms.   Figure 1....
Published: 01 September 2016
Figure 1. Framework for science argument and model in science classrooms. Figure 1. Framework for science argument and model in science classrooms. More
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A guideline for the written group <b>argument</b>.   Figure 4. A guideline for the...
Published: 01 September 2016
Figure 4. A guideline for the written group argument. Figure 4. A guideline for the written group argument. More
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Example of an <b>argument</b> written by a student group.   Figure 7. Example of a...
Published: 01 September 2016
Figure 7. Example of an argument written by a student group. Figure 7. Example of an argument written by a student group. More
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The components of an <b>argument</b> and the relationship between them.   Figure 1...
Published: 01 April 2014
Figure 1. The components of an argument and the relationship between them. Figure 1. The components of an argument and the relationship between them. More
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Example of an <b>argument</b> written by a student group.   Figure 6. Example of a...
Published: 01 April 2014
Figure 6. Example of an argument written by a student group. Figure 6. Example of an argument written by a student group. More
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Example of a student group’s revision of a written <b>argument</b>.   Figure 7. Ex...
Published: 01 April 2014
Figure 7. Example of a student group’s revision of a written argument. Figure 7. Example of a student group’s revision of a written argument. More
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A ninth-grade male student’s original <b>argument</b> response to the statement, “...
Published: 01 November 2013
Figure 2. A ninth-grade male student’s original argument response to the statement, “There is no difference between your biological sex and gender.” Figure 2. A ninth-grade male student’s original argument response to the statement, “There is no difference between your biological sex and More
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A ninth-grade male student’s revised <b>argument</b> response to the statement, “T...
Published: 01 November 2013
Figure 5. A ninth-grade male student’s revised argument response to the statement, “There is no difference between your biological sex and gender” after completing Parts I and II of the Human Karyotyping and Sex-Chromosome-Linked Disorders activity. Figure 5. A ninth-grade male student’s More
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (2010) 72 (7): 427–431.
Published: 01 September 2010
...Victor Sampson; Francesca Gerbino We describe two instructional techniques that science teachers can use to promote and support scientific argumentation inside the classroom. These techniques are designed to give students an opportunity to establish or validate a claim on the basis of reasons or to...
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Students use whiteboards to construct a tentative <b>argument</b>. This type of me...
Published: 01 September 2010
Figure 2. Students use whiteboards to construct a tentative argument. This type of medium helps make their thinking and reasoning visible. Figure 2. Students use whiteboards to construct a tentative argument. This type of medium helps make their thinking and reasoning visible. More
Journal Articles
The American Biology Teacher (2019) 81 (7): 513–519.
Published: 01 September 2019
...Paul J. Laybourn; Ellen Brisch; Alison M. Wallace; Meena M. Balgopal Much evidence supports the role of writing-to-learn (WTL) assignments in improving student learning and argumentation skills. However, designing effective assignments can be challenging for instructors. We describe a process for...