After the success of the polio vaccine in the 1950s, scientists turned to other “microbe-conquering” agendas, including finding connections between viruses and cancer. Even Jonas Salk turned to a cancer vaccine after preliminary data suggested that the measles virus was linked to leukemia. The renewed association between viruses and cancer in the 1960s provided the backdrop to the 1964 discovery of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). Fifty years later, various research teams, using a host of new technologies, have provided multiple lines of evidence that EBV does more than cause mononucleosis. As a 50-year anniversary text, Cancer Virus uses a straightforward chronology to tell us EBV’s complicated story, one in which we learn of the many scientists involved with EBV and their astounding findings. The narrative, however, does not stop in 2014, because EBV’s possible links between multiple sclerosis and individuals with previous mononucleosis infections serves notice that there is even...

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