Centering androgynes and eunuchs when we read ancient rabbinic texts can transform our understanding of late antique and Jewish approaches to sex and gender. In this book, the author argues that eunuchs and androgynes were central to discussions of sex and gender by the rabbis who authored and redacted classical rabbinic literature (e.g., Mishnah, Talmuds, and other writings in Roman Palestine and Sasanian Babylonia), even if their importance has been minimized by modern scholars and other parties. Rabbinic interest in the changeability of sex indeed establishes the rabbis as experts on interpreting the body, and, as the author holds, related discussions are neither inevitable derivations of biblical interpretation nor marginal asides. This excellent book, consequently, is positioned to contribute to and engage with two audiences that scholars rarely address simultaneously: both scholars and graduate students in fields of rabbinic literature / ancient Judaism and those who approach the study of...

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