Over the past two decades, the topic of religious violence has received considerable scholarly attention, only partly in response to the role of religious extremism in the Balkan conflicts during the 1990s and the attacks on New York and Washington, DC, in 2001. Of particular concern has been what ways, if any, religious commitments are responsible for the performance of violence, as well as whether “religious violence” is a phrase that obscures more than it reveals. It is of no surprise that scholars of Mediterranean antiquity have also turned to literary sources associated with the Greco-Roman world to ask these and related questions concerning the historical legacy of religious conflict and violence. Religious Violence in the Ancient World enters this ongoing discussion, offering a series of interventions developed from a conference on the topic held at the Université de Montréal and the University of Ottawa in September 2017.

What emerges...

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