It has always struck me as unfair that there are so many books about the emperor Constantine and so few books about his successor, the emperor Constantius II. The son, perhaps more than any other Roman ruler, deserves credit for securing the unity of the Roman state in the fourth century and also, not incidentally, for securing his father’s legacy and supporting the spread of Christianity. Muriel Moser’s recent book is thus doubly welcome. First, it offers a new view of this under-studied ruler and provides new evidence to demonstrate how ably he worked with senators and administrators to shape the empire for centuries to come. And second, happily, Moser’s study is clearly argued and deeply researched, resulting in an impressive accomplishment, especially given the nature of the evidence. We have no significant historical narrative source for Constantius’s early years in power. And even for his later years, our sources...

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