According to James Corke-Webster, Eusebius of Caesarea’s Ecclesiastical History (EH) is the product of a precise historical moment, namely the political and social upheavals of the late third and early fourth century. In this work Eusebius sought to position Christianity at the center of the new order emerging in the early fourth century and to define a prominent role for Christianity in it, in particular for Christian leaders. How did he do this? In brief, he adapted Christianity for Roman consumption.

The EH is a work of inculturation because Eusebius’s presentation of Christian history was calibrated to appeal to Roman cultural elites. He sought to align Christianity with traditional Roman values and presented a Romanized version of Christianity that filtered out or at least downplayed whatever was discordant with those values; likewise, he emphasized and perhaps even...

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