In the opening lines of her book, Lynn Kaye explains that “Time in the Babylonian Talmud explores how rabbinic jurists' language, reasoning, and storytelling reveal their assumptions about what we call time” (1). Drawing on insights from modernist writers, artists, and philosophers including Virginia Woolf, Marcel Proust, and Wassily Kandinsky, Kaye establishes at the outset of her work a capacious understanding of the concept of time, one that is not limited to time-keeping or temporal units such as hours but that encompasses various forms of legal and narrative temporalities. With this approach, she stakes a bold claim in the field: in contrast to scholars who define “time” narrowly and thus...

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