Andrew S. Jacobs argues that Epiphanius, bishop of Salamis (Constantia) on Cyprus in the later fourth century, is a key figure for understanding the culture of Late Antiquity. This is provocative, as Epiphanius, the compiler of the catalogue of heresies called the Panarion (‘Cure-All’), is often marginalized and mocked in modern times. However, Jacobs argues persuasively that Epiphanius decisively shaped the debates gripping Christianity in Late Antiquity. Jacobs introduces Epiphanius’ life and works, and demonstrates in five case studies how he contributed to discourses on celebrity, conversion, discipline, scripture, and salvation during his lifetime. He concludes with a brief exploration of Epiphanius’ own “After Lives,” first as a Jewish convert and miracle-worker in a fifth-century hagiographic vita, then as a key player in Iconoclasm (on both sides), and finally as a character in a Victorian novel by Thomas Wimberley Mossman. Jacobs succeeds throughout in putting Epiphanius back in his...

You do not currently have access to this content.