Humans are comforted by the organization of information. After all, the sturdy Tupperware provided by clear definitions, typologies, rubrics, and classifications are intended to allay that most human of emotions: doubt. Our love of knowledge organization explains the enduring popularity of texts like Pliny the Elder's Natural History or perhaps Isidore of Seville's Etymologies, but it also goes a long way toward explaining the enduring obsession with defining what, exactly, the field of digital humanities is or is not. In 2012, when Digital_Humanities was first published by MIT Press, the authors sought to provide a definition and exploration of the digital humanities (henceforth DH) that could, in their opinion, serve...

You do not currently have access to this content.